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AV & MULTIMEDIA


The specially drawn Cooper Hewitt typeface, designed by Chester Jenkins, is used in this article for the headings


Streets Ahead As Cooper Hewitt reinvents interactive capabilities


for visitors, the head of engineering talks us through the diff erent parts of the digital experience


C Pentagram designed a


new graphic identity and signage for the museum


ooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in New York has emerged from a $81m (£52m, €73m) three-year renovation.


Then-head of engineering Aaron Cope told Attractions Management about the interactive elements, which use cutting-edge technologies and custom-made hardware to create a pioneering visitor experience. The experience hinges on the idea of a visitor account. Using an NFC- enabled “pen” users can scan object codes and save artefacts of interest to their personal museum Web page. Cooper Hewitt developed in-house its own digital infrastructure and systems architecture, including the


Collections Browser. Mass digitisation of the collection is almost complete. “The Collections Browser became the scaffolding for everything that followed,” Cope says, including the Pen, Process Lab and Immersion Room. Cope explained the new experience.


Collections Browser


Visitors simultaneously view high-resolution images of the collection


The Collections Browser runs on the museum’s seven interactive Ideum tables that vary in size up to 84 inches for multiple users of six to eight people. You can browse the objects on display, related objects and see an object’s context in relation to the museum’s historical collection. You can use the tables to create your own designs which you can save to your account.


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PHOTOS THIS PAGE: MATT FLYNN / COOPER HEWITT SMITHSONIAN DESIGN MUSEUM


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