This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Feature PRISM


This solution has not only the potential to address the Pu problem but also to generate low-carbon electricity.


Supply chain event


The inaugural PRISM supplier conference, hosted by GEH in early April with support from Britain’s Energy Coast Business Cluster, was held in West Cumbria, to recognise the expertise within the Sellafield and West Cumbria supply chain. The event highlighted the opportunities that the proposed PRISM project could create for the UK, the capabilities of the scheme and the opportunity for potential suppliers to get involved with its development through early engagement.


GEH was joined at the event by leading engineering companies Costain, Arup and Pöyry, named as GEH ‘CAP Alliance’ partners and bringing with them to the PRISM project experience of working within Sellafield and the UK nuclear market.


It is a simplified reactor design, allowing factory fabrication with modular construction and ultimately lower costs.


Working with NNL and the Dalton Nuclear Institute


GEH signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) in early April to access expert technical input towards a specifically designed UK PRISM reactor.


Paul Howarth, NNL Managing Director, explains: “With our recognised technical capability and long experience in fuel cycle analysis, we look forward to working with GEH to provide independent and authoritative advice in developing its approach to helping the UK address its plutonium legacy.”


A second MOU with the University of Manchester will provide academic support, knowledge and experience via the Dalton


18 NuclearCONNECT


Nuclear Institute, which recently won a Diamond Jubilee Queen’s Anniversary Prize for its world-leading nuclear research and skills development for the nuclear industry.


Current position


The Government currently has a preferred policy option for the life-cycle management of Pu via re-use as MOX fuel. However, alternative proposals offering better value or lower risk to the taxpayer are not being ruled out. To gather more data on all options, the NDA issued a request for approaches if companies believed they could develop and deliver a credible alternative to Pu re-use as MOX fuel.


“The UK has a wealth of expertise in a wide range of disciplines ... which we need to tap into.”


GEH approached the NDA to suggest that its PRISM technology was now at a more advanced stage of development. The NDA has contracted GEH to carry out feasibility work in a number of key areas, including the proposed commercial structure, the disposability of the fuel, the risk transfer model, the costs and the licencability of the PRISM offering. Through that study the NDA will consider the credibility of the proposal and make recommendations that will affect the future for PRISM in the UK.


David Powell summarises: “The PRISM project is progressing extremely well. We continue to get interest from a wide range of other stakeholders on our solution for dealing with the UK’s plutonium. Engage- ment with potential suppliers is particularly important to us. We have already held one supplier conference in West Cumbria, which gave very positive feedback and lots of follow-up interest. We are working our way from there and look forward to further discussions with potential suppliers later this year. The UK has a wealth of expertise in a wide range of disciplines, ranging from construction and civil engineering to some of the specialist areas of nuclear technology, which we need to tap into.”


www.ge-energy.com/products_and_ services/products/nuclear_energy/ prism_sodium_cooled_reactor.jsp


Words: Penny Lees PRISM quick facts


• Would generate significant jobs and electricity.


• Option to dispose of the UK plutonium stockpile within five years.


• Profitable solution by creating a new supply of electricity.


• Maintains options to completely recycle Pu.


• Ready to begin UK licensing path now.


• Modular design that improves schedule certainty.


• Flexible enough to maximise proliferation risk.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com