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Wild chervil is a noxious weed prevalent in the Fraser Valley along roadsides and in pastures. Its fast growth, large size, and ability to create monocultures poses a serious threat to native plants, crops, and agriculture.

many: forage production of pastures can be decreased by 50 percent, alkaloids in the plant taint honey so that it is too bitter and off-colour to market, and if ingested by livestock, tansy ragwort can cause permanent liver damage.

Wild chervil (Anthriscus sylvestris)

is another noxious weed prevalent in the Fraser Valley along roadsides and in pastures. Introduced through wildflower mixes for its pretty, delicate, white flowers and finely- divided leaves, wild chervil is highly adaptable and can grow in a wide range of soil fertility, light, and moisture regimes. Its fast growth, large size, and ability to create monocultures poses a serious threat to native plants, crops, and agriculture.

Wild chervil is also a host to a virus that infects carrots, celery, and parsnips. Birds, water, and humans are the primary vectors of seed spread. Mowing after the plant has set seed is responsible for its movement along transportation corridors and other linear rights-of- way.

These are just a few examples of the invasive species to which we are host in B.C. So, what can the average citizen do to stop the spread of invasive plants? There are many things. Here is a list from the Invasive Plant Council of B.C. web site:

 Avoid walking/driving/riding through invasive plant infestations.  Remove seed and plant parts from clothing, pets, vehicles, and equipment  Dispose properly by bagging invasive plants for the local refuse site. Be sure to inform the landfill operator that you have invasive plants and not regular yard waste.  Avoid letting invasive plants fruit or set seed, as birds, animals, and humans can spread the seeds.

 Avoid picking plants from the roadsides; many of the prettiest wildflowers are aggressive invasive species.  Learn how to identify and report invasive plants in your community. Go to www.invasiveplantcouncilbc.ca and contact your local regional weed committee coordinator.

Help stop the spread of invasive plants. Spread the word, not the weed!

— Jeanne Hughes is coordinator of the Fraser Valley Invasive Plant Partnership

Double twin flails for grass cutting and light scrub clearing

Universal hammer flails for heavy duty pulverizing

Rugged flail choppers to mow, shred and evenly spread

Chopping the heaviest materials, just leaving a fine mulch behind

• Width 125-225 cm

• Can be centrally mounted or offset • Double twin flails or heavy, robust hammer flails

• Pulverize wood up to diameter of 5 cm • Low profile

• Simple and easily adjustable to offset position, either mechanically or hydraulically

• Heavy, adjustable back roller with sealed bearings and anti-wrap feature • Follows contours of the ground

GERARD’S EQUIPMENT LTD.

33684 Highway 97 South, Oliver, BC

(250) 498-2524 or (250) 498-6231 • Fax (250) 498-3288

12 British Columbia Berry Grower • Summer 2010

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