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2017 Points of Emphasis


BODY CHECKING – At 12U, 10U, and 8U a player may not deliver a body check to an opponent. Allowable body contact at these levels are legal holds, legal pushes, the use of equal pressure against an opponent to gain possession of a loose ball, defensive positioning to redirect an opponent in possession of the ball, and contact deemed incidental by officials.


ILLEGAL STICK CHECKING (SLASHING AND CROSS CHECKING) – Any stick checks that are not to a players crosse or hands of a player in possession of the ball is considered a slash or cross check. Officials are expected to enforce this rule.


COACHES AND TEAM AREA – At 12U and 14U the only time a coach is allowed to enter the lacrosse field is to attend to an injured player, to warm up a goalkeeper, or during halftime. If a coach is on the field of play during a live ball or dead ball for any other instance and the coach does not have permission from an official, it is considered a foul. Officials are encouraged to enforce this rule and keep coaches restricted to the sideline and coaches area during live play, during timeouts and between quarters.


MOUTH GUARDS - It is strongly recommended that mouth guards be properly fitted and not be altered any manner which decreases their effective protection. Mouth guards cannot be clear and must be of any visible color other than white to allow for easier rule enforcement by officials. Coaches should instruct players to have their mouth guards properly in their mouths at all times (i.e. no fish hooking). Officials must enforce this rule.


BOYS’ YOUTH RULEBOOK | 7


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