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© UNHCR/ Saiful Huq Omi


WHY IS UNHCR CONCERNED ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE?


Every day UNHCR staff assist people who often live on the front lines of climate change. In fact, the majority of the 60 million people of concern to UNHCR are found in “climate change hotspots” around the world. They include refugees, asylum- seekers,


returnees, internally displaced


and stateless people who face the risk of a second or even repeated displacement due to the effects of climate change.


Climate change and disasters can also increase social tensions and accelerate armed conflict, which in turn can result in displacement of people. When vulnerable populations experience more incidents of extreme weather, coupled with other political,


social and economic stresses,


they often have no choice but to flee. These people are entitled to UNHCR support.


For over two decades UNHCR has advocated for states to act upon climate change issues, demonstrating that climate change will have a significant


impact on


food and water insecurity and competition over


resources for struggling to survive.


A global authority, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) gathers together


thousands of scientists people already


to


provide a clear and timely view of the current state of scientific knowledge about climate change. For the first


time


in 2014, IPCC explicitly recognized that “Climate change over the 21st century is projected to increase displacement of people” and “can indirectly increase risks of violent conflicts in the form of civil war and inter-group violence by amplifying well-documented drivers of these conflicts such as poverty and economic shocks.”


UNHCR /


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