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Professional Matters


CPA KNOW-HOW


We asked three CPAs about work-life balance in the summer


BY JACLYN LAW


Prepare for the long, sunny days of summer by planning ahead and making time for yourself


Henry Korenblum, CPA, CA, CPA (Illinois), CFP, MBA TAX MANAGER, KESTENBERG RABINOWICZ PARTNERS LLP MARKHAM, ONT.


“I’m part of a group of five tax members at a firm that handles domestic and international tax work for individuals, corporations and trusts/estates. We put in longer hours during busier times such as tax season from February to April. Vacation is when we recharge our batteries; those are the times to enjoy life and focus on work-life


balance. July and August are typically quieter, so it’s a good time to enjoy the weather and see friends and family. To ensure coverage at our department, we plan well in advance, communicating with each other and the firm’s partners. We respect each other’s commitments and responsibilities. Sometimes we’ll change our vacation dates to ensure we have that coverage.”


Trisha Fournier-Hoyt, FCPA, FCGA, MBA DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND OPERATIONS, UNIVERSITY OF NEW BRUNSWICK,


AND OWNER OF SORELLA SALONSPA FREDERICTON “At both the university and my salon-spa, we incorporate flexible hours for summer, so people can leave earlier and enjoy the daytime hours. The university also offers ways for people to embrace the season, including a walking group and lunch-hour interdepartmental softball. We also bring in students to help out, and at the salon


I hire extra help to cover vacations. We start planning in January, so we don’t end up short-handed. Murphy’s Law is that everyone wants the long weekends. You need a way to prioritize requests fairly. If people have weddings or family functions to get to, fellow employees are usually happy to oblige.”


Nuruddin Jassa, CPA, CMA FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATOR, CALGARY CATHOLIC IMMIGRATION SOCIETY


CALGARY


“I work at a nonprofit organization that provides settlement and integration services to all immigrants and refugees in southern Alberta. My responsibilities include developing and maintaining accounting principles, practices and procedures to ensure accurate and timely financial statements and financial reporting. In the


summer, my 11-year-old daughter wants to do things, and I have to be self-disciplined to make time and still meet deadlines. My strategy is to have earlier, self-imposed deadlines. For example, if I have a report due in the last two weeks of the month, I give myself a deadline on the 22nd. I try to educate my family as well. For my daughter, schooling and lessons are important, and the equivalent for me is work. It has to be a win-win outcome. At the same time, we have to be organized and support each other.”


12 | CPA MAGAZINE | JUNE/JULY 2016


Three money savers for travel


Travel light. Some airlines charge for your first checked bag. See if you can get away with just a carry-on.


Take advantage of shoulder seasons. Save cash and avoid the crowds — but still enjoy decent weather — by visiting popular destinations just before or after high season. Think Mexico and the Caribbean in early summer, Europe and Hawaii in the fall, Hong Kong in the winter, and New Zealand in the spring.


Protect yourself. Don’t leave home without insurance for travel delays, trip cancellation and emergency medical assistance. It provides peace of mind and could save your bacon — and hundreds or thousands of dollars — if problems arise.


Let’s talk


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(@CPAcanada), YouTube (YouTube. com/CPAcanada), LinkedIn (Official CPA Canada [Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada] Member Group) and Facebook (facebook.com/ CPAcanada)


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