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Objects Are Closer theN They Appear


WRITTEN BY ART GISSENDANER


In fact, children can seemingly vanish in broad daylight from the view of bus drivers, despite state and federal regulations designed to eliminate the threat of injury in the Danger Zone


It


is an area that extends approximately 10 feet from the school bus on all sides. It has proven to be the last treacherous piece of


real estate students traverse before reaching the safety of the school bus, and the first hazard they encoun- ter after leaving that sanctuary. It’s a place where students have fallen prey to errant, distracted drivers passing the bus while it is loading or unloading stu- dents. Some students have also been killed by their own bus, because they became lost in one of several blind spots where their driver lost track of them. Te area is a virtual no man’s land for students,


50 School Transportation News • MAY 2017


and it is appropriately called the “Danger Zone.” And despite the number of student fatalities oc- curring there being at an all-time low, some student transportation safety experts say there is still much more that can be done to increase the safety of chil- dren as the load and unload school buses. Annual figures released by the Kansas State De-


partment of Education’s in its School Bus Loading and Unloading survey indicate that for the past two years the number of reported deaths of students in the Danger Zone is at four. “If we have one child killed in the danger zone, it’s


CELEBRATING25YEARS


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