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GEM - a Global Collaboration


The GEM Project was born of collaboration, and is one of the best examples of how working together will lead us to new treatments and the cure for Crohn’s disease.


In 2007, Crohn’s and Colitis Canada challenged the Canadian research community to come up with new ways to investigate the triggers of Crohn’s disease. Investigators based at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto rose to the challenge and the GEM Project was born. This landmark, international study is tracking


healthy relatives of people with Crohn’s disease to better understand how genetic, environmental and microbial factors are linked to development of the disease.


The past year was an exciting time for the GEM Project. The number of participants enrolled in the study grew to over 3,000 and new international research sites joined the study, building on this global, collaborative effort.


It was also an exciting time of increased project funding that will enable GEM to achieve its goal of 5,000 study participants – a critical number for maximizing outcomes of the project. In April 2014, we were proud to announce $6 million in funding from the Helmsley Charitable Trust. This funding will be leveraged to match an additional $4 million in donor support that will be raised through a special fundraising partnership with the University of Toronto and Mount Sinai Hospital.


As the GEM Project builds momentum, we continue to encourage families living with Crohn’s to consider participating in the study at gemproject.ca.


“ GENETIC predisposition


Collaboration was at the heart of the inception of the GEM Project and continues to be the driving force behind the execution and its eventual success.


– Dr. Ken Croitoru, GEM Project lead





ENVIRONMENTAL influences


MICROBIAL interactions


13 ANNUA 13 | ANNUAL 13 | ANNUAL REPORT 2014 UAL REPORT2 AL REPORO T 014T 20


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