This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Rounds NEWS FROM AMERICA’S BEST MEDICAL SOCIETY


Jim Swink, Chuck Curtis, and Bob Lilly, and Coach Abe Martin. He recalls Bubba Thornton’s 78-yard punt return to help knock off Texas in 1967 as if it hap- pened yesterday. To this day, he carries a grudge against the late Texas coach Darrell Royal for his 1961 comparison of TCU to a bunch of cockroaches. “It’s not what they eat and tote off,” Coach Royal said, “It’s what they fall into and mess up that hurts.” But he’s more than a fan. Dr. Broth-


Born to wear purple


BY LARRY BESAW When Fort Worth orthopedic surgeon Stephen L. Brotherton, MD, becomes the Texas Medical Association’s 148th president at TexMed 2013 in San Antonio later this month, chances are he’ll wear something purple. Just as protein is one of the three basic food groups, purple is one of the basic colors of his wardrobe. And that’s fitting for a rabid fan of the Texas Christian University (TCU) Horned Frogs. You could say it was preordained for him to root for TCU. Dr. Brotherton was


born in Fort Worth to an equally intense TCU fan father. He’s a proud TCU alumnus, and he was raised in the lore of players like Slingin’ Sammy Baugh, Davey O’Brien,


erton treats the TCU football players’ in- juries as the school’s senior orthopedic consultant. Go to a TCU home game, or many of the road games for that mat- ter, and you’ll find Dr. Brotherton on the sidelines. He’s developed close relation- ships with players and coaches. In fact, head coach Gary Patterson dedicated TCU’s 2009 win over Utah that earned the Horned Frogs a trip to the Fiesta Bowl to Dr. Brotherton’s father, who died of cancer the night before the game. “That was for your dad,” Dr. Brotherton recalled the coach telling him as the con- ference championship victory celebra- tion ended. Don’t misunderstand. Dr. Brotherton is about more than TCU football. He’s not only passionate about TCU, but he’s also passionate about medicine, what it can do for patients, and what organized medicine can do for physicians. His pri- orities as TMA president will include working against the federal govern- ment’s continuing encroachment into the patient-physician relationship, en- hancing primary care, remaining vigilant against nonphysicians’ ongoing attempts to practice medicine, and promoting the county medical society system in Texas. He discussed those issues with Texas Medicine.


May 2013 TEXAS MEDICINE 7


JIM LINCOLN


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60