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COBO CENTER HIGHLIGHTS


• The newly revamped, 2.4-million-square-foot Cobo Center offers one of the largest exhibit floors in the country and can sustain more weight than any venue in North America.


• Getting to Detroit is as easy as getting around Detroit. The city is within a 90-minute flight of 60 percent of the U.S. population, and attendees can access the city’s 2.9-mile monorail through a dedicated station on the third level of Cobo Center.


• Meeting attendees won’t have to look far to see changes in the city. The city has invested more than $15 billion into re-energizing its downtown, from new sports and entertainment venues to three world-class casinos and several new luxury hotels within walking distance of Cobo Center.


Moving forward Whether it’s the transformed Cobo Center or one of the many new hotels, restaurants, and attractions that have helped reshape downtown, Detroit has a multitude of new reasons why planners should give “America’s Great Comeback City” a second look.


• Detroit Metro Airport (DTW), a major hub for Delta Air Lines, is one of the best-connected airports in the nation, with service on more than 13 passenger airlines. Visitors have more than 1,200 daily flights at their disposal, traveling to and from nearly 150 nonstop destinations on four continents.


CONVENTION CENTER SPECS


turning the city’s great architectural land- marks into mixed-use developments that pay homage to the city’s past while looking forward to the future. In the past 10 years, more than $15 billion has been invested into new downtown projects, from sports and entertainment venues to new ofices for General Motors, Compuware, and Quicken Loans. New restaurants, retail, and nightlife have sprung up as well. Culturally, Detroit has never been richer. More than 30 art muse- ums call Detroit home, including the Detroit Institute of Arts, the fifth-largest fine-arts museum in the country, and the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, the largest of its kind in the world. Detroit is also among the largest theater districts in the country, and visitors can take in a show at the elaborate Fox Theatre or a concert at the Masonic Temple. There are also plenty of new experi-


PCMA.ORG


ences to discover at Detroit’s three casinos. The MGM Grand Detroit recently added the Wolfgang Puck Steak restaurant to the property, which also includes a 400-room hotel, a 20,000-square-foot spa, five dining options, and a 100,000-square-foot casino. In downtown, Greektown Casino-Hotel has also debuted a new signature restaurant, Brizola, which focuses on steak, seafood, and wine. Greektown’s 400-room hotel includes six restaurants and a casino with 2,700 slots and video-poker machines, while the AAA Four-Diamond MotorCity Casino Hotel has six dining options, 67,000 square feet of func- tion and banquet space, 400 hotel rooms, a 13,000-square-foot spa, and a casino.


For more information: Detroit Metro Con- vention & Visitors Bureau — (888) 225-5389 or (313) 202-1800; meetdetroit.com


Total contiguous exhibit space • 625,000 square feet on the concourse level, plus 100,000 square feet on the river level


Ballroom spaces • A 27,000-square-foot ballroom on the concourse level, a 27,000-square-foot banquet hall on the second level, and the 40,000-square-front riverfront ballroom


Total meeting space • 195,000 square feet


Meeting and banquet rooms • 79


Load-in access • 31 enclosed bays, 28 freight doors, and 10 freight elevators


Parking spaces • 7,000 within four blocks


Downtown hotel rooms • 4,200


FEBRUARY 2013 PCMA CONVENE


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