This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BETA | MO-CAP SPECIAL


Keeping in Motion


Holding pace with motion capture’s furious progress can be tough going. Thankfully Craig Chapple has talked with the specialty’s finest about where the technology is at and where it will be tomorrow


MOTION CAPTURE technology has come a long way in recent years. Films like Avatar are becoming old news, and the likes of Rockstar’s ground-breaking L.A. Noire has shown that even the current generation of console hardware, with its slower cycle, can continue to push boundaries. Although the various methodologies motion capture has become are not without their constraints and difficulties, an increasingly democratised technological landscape has ushered in an era of accesibility and affordability. There are now more pre-visualisation,


more alternate capture methods and more cameras at a smaller size that can record ever subtler nuances in an actor’s performance. There has also been a move into non-optical


28 | DECEMBER 2011 / JANUARY 2012


capture, including inertial systems and surface capture, as well as the emergence of the virtual camera. “When I first started using motion capture,


there was no pre-visualisation of the motion capture data at all,” reminisces James Comstock, VP of Engineering facial animation experts Captive Motion.


BACK IN THE DAY “We essentially had to build the tools by hand. Now developers can buy systems that will display full body motion capture in real- time and allow them to see exactly what they are getting as the capture is happening.” Audiomotion co-founder Mick Morris


agrees that mo-cap has changed significantly over the last decade, and at an impressive pace.


“In our 13 years, the tech has improved dramatically from tiny capture volumes, low-res cameras and limited tools for post- production. Today we can utilise over 100 cameras, and capture huge volumes with multiple performers with faces and fingers. “For Audiomotion this is a result of


working very closely with Vicon here in Oxford. Collaborating closely with the engineers, helping them develop cutting edge solutions.” Hein Beute, product manager of Xsens,


whose tools were used in Sony’s Killzone 2, says that the technology has moved on to become more accessible and provide better and faster pipelines. “Motion capture is getting more accessible to different kinds of users,” he suggests. “Ease


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76