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MINI PROJECT RIFLE: THE REMINGTON 700 SPS TACTICAL


we couldn’t submit our equipment. Malcolm Cooper, owner of Accuracy International, approached our German optical manufacturers to obtain our 6 x 42 telescopic sights for their submission and was initially advised that would not be possible as the design of the scope belonged to Peter Sarony and his company.


When Malcolm then explained to Hans that his company would be getting the MoD order, he relented and provided our optics to Accuracy International for the tender and also diverted our distributorship to them! He apologised to me saying that we didn’t have them sufficiently ‘tied up’ contractually to stop them! That relatively modest concern, on the success of the Accuracy International sniper rifle system, including the sniper scope we had conceived and developed, became the hugely successful supplier of tactical type scopes that it is today, namely Schmidt & Bender.


After Hungerford (a 1988 shooting massacre carried out by a maniac using legally held semi- automatic AK 47 and M1 carbine rifles plus a Beretta


9mm pistol), we


lost our self- loading rifles and


reverted to bolt-action repeating rifles to continue our sport, which is when we began manufacturing our Remington based ‘PR’ turn-bolts with large- capacity detachable


magazines. The BGR was too costly to manufacture in small quantities and the Remington 700 was far more economic as a base platform, that being the most successful bolt-action in production then and now!


I had, in any event, been focussing on the inherent weaknesses and problems with existing bolt-action full-bore rifles and had developed my own completely


When Parker-Hale Ltd were closing down, we took the opportunity to negotiate with the auctioneers who had in fact purchased all their inventory and managed to acquire all the equipment and tooling associated with the barrel manufacture prior to the auction. We subsequently also managed to acquire from BAE’s Royal Ordnance Nottingham Small- Arms Division our pick of further barrel production equipment from that factory which they were also closing and that included the vital specialist vertical honing machinery that Parker-Hale never had in house!


Unfortunately, what we had understood to have been an agreement with the new property owners to rent the end section of the Parker-Hale factory space that housed the barrel plant, proved not to be the


98


original concept and designs. I really didn’t want to risk these being launched onto the marketplace and plagiarised as had my other product designs thus far, despite my costly US & UK Patents and Copyright etc!


I decided that we had to set up our own in house manufacturing facilities so that we could produce the new rifles and then hit the market hard when we rolled out the new designs, having filed the patents immediately before that unveiling. We acquired CNC machining centres and lathes etc but that left the problem of how to manufacture the barrels, a most vital element in the whole system.


Having researched the options, it became evident that cold hammer forged barrels, were the best for delivering enduring provided every stage was properly which


high accuracy,


of manufacture implemented,


is why the major brands,


including SIG Hammerli, Enfield, FN, Beretta, Steyr-


Mannlicher, Sako, Tikka, H&K and Remington etc have adopted this method for their barrel production.


The barrel has been beautifully fluted and blued.


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