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Australia 100 and South Africa 100 Overview


Water management in Australia


Water is one of the most vulnerable resources in Australia. Over-allocation of water resources has been compounded by unpredictability in rainfall and a population growth of 1.7% per year.1


In some river


catchments, increasing urban and rural water demand has already exceeded sustainable levels of supply.


The country is particularly susceptible to climate change and long-term drought. Based on annual renewable water supply per person (1995) at the watershed level, significant portions of Australia are already experiencing extreme water scarcity, a situation


in which disruptive water shortages can frequently occur.2


Based on


projections for 2025, this level of extreme water scarcity is expected to intensify.


In response to the challenges of climate change and water availability, the Australian government developed Water for the Future, a long-term initiative built on four key priorities: taking action on climate change, using water wisely, securing water supplies, and supporting healthy rivers.3


Strategic programs to


address these priorities include improved water management arrangements, and a renewed commitment to deliver a range of water policy reforms in both rural and urban areas.


“Water is a critical component of the fibre cement manufacturing process and all of our plants recognize the importance of water conservation.”


James Hardie Industries


41% Australia 100 Response rate: (22/54)


Sectors within Australia 100: Consumer Discretionary: 1 of 7; Consumer Staples: 3 of 5; Energy: 2 of 8; Financials: 3 of 5; Health Care: 1 of 1; Industrials: 0 of 4; Information Technology: 0 of 1; Materials: 12 of 19; Utilities: 0 of 4


Responding industries: Beverages: 1 of 2; Biotechnology: 1 of 1; Chemicals: 1 of 2; Construction Materials: 2 of 2; Containers & Packaging: 1 of 1; Energy Equipment & Services: 1 of 1; Food & Staples Retailing: 2 of 2; Insurance: 1 of 1; Metals & Mining: 8 of 14; Oil, Gas & Consumable Fuels: 1 of 7; Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs): 2 of 3; Textiles, Apparel & Luxury Goods: 1 of 1


1 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), “IPCC Technical Paper VI: Climate Change and Water.” June 2008. (http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/technical-papers/climate-change-water-en.pdf)


2 World Business Council for Sustainable Development, “Global Water Tool 2011.” Version 2011.01. (http://www.wbcsd.org/templates/TemplateWBCSD5/layout.asp?type=p&MenuId=MTc1Mg&doOpen=1&ClickMenu=LeftMenu)


3 Australian Government, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population, and Communities, “Water for the Future.” October 18, 2011. (http://www.environment.gov.au/water/australia/index.html)


4 Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, “Aquastat: Global Information System on Water and Agriculture.” 2011. (http://www.fao.org/nr/water/aquastat/main/index.stm)


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