This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
INDUSTRYAPPLICATION


efficiency and comfort, the new system could play a valuable role in ensuring the effectiveness of army operations.”


PV cells, thermoelectric devices and advanced energy storage devices are already widely used in a range of applications. A key aim of the project team, however, is to produce robust, hard-wearing designs specifically for military use in tough, hostile conditions.


To tackle the many challenges that the project presents, the team includes specialists from a wide range of disciplines including chemistry, materials science, process engineering, electrical engineering and design.


Feedback from serving soldiers will also play a crucial role in optimising the power system for front-line use.


“We aim to produce a prototype system within two years,” says Professor Gregory. “We also anticipate that the technology that we develop could be adapted for other and very varied uses. One possibility is in niche space applications for powering satellites, another could be to provide means to transport medicines or supplies at cool temperatures in disaster areas or to supply fresh food in difficult economic or climatic conditions”.


The project will receive total EPSRC and MOD funding of just over £650,000. In addition, the University of Leeds and Brunel University are also providing funding, and


21


communications and avionics electronics company Rockwell-Collins are supporting a studentship which will contribute to the project.


© 2011 Angel Business Communications. Permission required.


www.solar-pv-uk.com Issue III 2011


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32