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DESIGN AT HOME


HAND-FORGED WITH A MODERN TWIST an updated spin on old-school heavy metal


BY ANDY STONEHOUSE


Don’t let the name confuse you, Ashore Chandeliers is much more than custom-made forged iron chandeliers. Much more. In fact, the owner likes to describe his company as “a Louis Vuitton of furniture,” stressing that they are more than just a factory, but a designer of quality tables, beds and home décor, including mirrors, table lamps and more. Owner Kash Ashore says that he will be adding a new,


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new customers and try out an entirely different design feel. In the meantime, don’t expect Ashore Chandeliers’ much-beloved, made-to-order catalog to go completely mod- ern. The company has certainly made a name for itself as a skilled and consistent purveyor of elegant, ornate and very traditional wrought-iron lighting and furniture, appropriate for modern homes.


experimental contemporary element to many of the compa- ny’s creations. It’s a move he’s excited about, considering he’s also the head designer. “We will be introducing a new line of material that I call ‘old-world modern’—items that are cleaner in design, but still forged, versus


all that machine-made ‘lights on a stick’ pieces that everyone else is offering,” he says. Ashore expects his revolu- tionary new work to be a small category in what is presently a very large range of furnishings, but says he’s eager to introduce it as an opportunity to attract


That means plenty of elabo- rate detail—wild animals blend- ed into the lines of a suspended iron pot rack, or complex swirls and spins contained within the shape of a French-inspired cof- fee table—and a solid and very timeless character to the various pieces.


“Nothing is prefabricated— we still make everything by hand, as they did hundreds of years ago,” Ashore says. He admits his stylish and proudly historically inspired metal cre- ations face a bit of a crossroads, popular as his business still is. “About 10 years ago, there were probably 200 companies doing what we do, and now we’re one of very few old-world- style blacksmiths, certainly one of the top five in the country,” he says. Ashore is a second-generation Persian blacksmith, with his father learning the trade as a young man before settling in Texas. The family began their Dallas-based business in 1990, primarily as a repair shop for other people’s work, but also creating some original furniture. Over time the original cus- tom work became more and more of the focus. The success of their furniture and the com- pany’s intricate lighting designs helped the company grow into what is today, with a family of showrooms in North Carolina, Las Vegas and a new outlet in Houston, plus a reopening of their showroom in Atlanta. Ashore and his team still make by hand all of the prod- ucts in their factory, five minutes south of downtown Dallas, using age-old blacksmithing techniques—the boss him- self likes to get very involved


Photographs courtesy of Ashore Chandeliers


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