This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
DSD 74


as possible, Annick used her background in design to begin bringing rare antiques back from her visits. She opened a small 900-square-foot store located in North Dallas, which today is an 8,000-square-foot showroom in the Design District. Having grown up around antiques all of his life and traveling to France often to visit family, Patrick decided to try out the business 11 years ago. “As a child, you don’t really understand anything about the pieces; they are just something you live with,” he remembers. “Ironically, it wasn’t until I joined the business that I realized how much I could appreciate the history of the pieces and why people become addicted to searching for and researching items. You quickly learn that to really understand the history of the antiques, you have to learn a bit about the history of the society that created them.”


The two make buying trips to France three to four times a year to handpick every item for their store. In addition to the French focus, the store also carries a selection of Spanish, Italian, Belgian and some German antiques. “We are very selective with the pieces,” says Annick. “We try to locate the unusual pieces that someone cannot just stum- ble over in any store. We do not just load a container; we look carefully and buy what we love. We are looking for exceptional and unusual merchandise.” “There are a great number of dealers and thousands of pieces on the market all over the world. You have to be very selective,” Patrick stresses. “When some- one visits our showroom, we want them to be able to notice an immediate sense of quality. This means a substantial amount of time sifting through available pieces on the market.”


“Generally, based on our experience and history in the business, we already know what we are looking at. For instance, if we find a tapestry, we know if it is from the 17th century and by its design, who the likely manufacturer was,” says Annick, who has been working with antiques for 33 years. In addition to providing a wide selection of fine antiques, Le Louvre is known for its out- door and garden items, located in a 2,000-square-foot outdoor area at the rear of the store. Patrick informs buyers that all of the fountains are hand-carved limestone from France and sometimes Italy. “Although not all are antique, the distressing and the added antique patina make them look centuries old.” Like most elements of design, the popularity of antiques is cyclical, but both Annick and Patrick feel that today’s homes can have both contemporary


and antique pieces. “A contem- porary design with a stunning antique or two can make for a sophisticated look,” says Annick. “Whether it’s a verdure tapestry or antique walnut desk, these antiques can provide a fabulous contrast and instantly give elegance and warmth to a room.”


“Antiques have been cared for and cherished by people, in some cases for over 500 years, and there is no reason to believe that this will suddenly change,” says Patrick. Antiques will always retain their value over time and are looked at as an investment. “They are a type of investment that can be enjoyed and used in everyday life,” says Annick. 2


LE LOUVRE FRENCH ANTIQUES


1400 Slocum St. Dallas, TX 75207 214-742-2605


lelouvre-antiques.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196