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DESIGN F INE ART


SEEING THE BIGGER PICTURE more than a gallery, russell tether is complete art management


BY COURTNEY JACKSON 1


DSD 64


When it comes to purchasing art, one might not think beyond a piece they are drawn to in a gallery. But there are so many variables to consider when starting a collection. When this becomes overwhelming, look no further than Russell Tether Fine Arts Associates, an independent gallery that provides compre- hensive art management. Tether himself has been involved with fine art professionally and personally for over 30 years. “Our expertise in consulting, art management, research and market analysis allows us to maximize value for our clients in both acquisitions and sales,”


he explains. Russell Tether is more than a gallery where one can procure fine art, in fact the firm goes far beyond simple sales and pro- vides all services necessary to meet the needs of wealth man- agement and estate advisors, individual and family collections, legal and accounting firms, and municipalities and institutions. “Our research on market trends and historical performance data, coupled with personal attention to our clients’ specific positions, are integrated to provide a com- prehensive program that meets the objectives of each estate or collection,” notes Tether. “We


also offer framing, conserva- tion and installation consulting services.”


At the time of its conception,


Russell Tether Fine Arts Associates joined only a handful of galleries that exclusively handle works on the secondary market. Within nine months, they were so busy they were refusing work. While at times Russell Tether purchas- es certain works of art, most clients consign artwork to the gallery. This creates a mutual- ly beneficial relationship and allows maximum value for both parties. The firm prides itself on the amount of research and personal attention its associates


invest in their clients to ensure success. Tether believes that art collecting is very different from decorating and should not be impulsive. A person looking to start an art collection should build it on paper first by deter- mining what periods and artists are intriguing, become knowl- edgeable about the value of the works and spend quality time researching the history of the artists. “A strong foundation is


1. DeForrest Judd


Lake Scene, Night, 1960 Oil on masonite 20" x 36"


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