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DESIGN DINING


AN OPEN SECRET


randy’s steakhouse staked out frisco before becoming the next big thing BY MADELYN MILLER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY HOLGER OBENAUS


A restaurant owner-chef has to wear many hats—king of the kitchen is his most revered role—but he also has to be a great busi- nessman. A trend predictor. A mind reader who senses what his clients want even before they realize they are craving comfort food or kale. An interior decorator who packages his restaurant with the right look. Randy Burks, owner and head chef of


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Randy’s Steakhouse, seems to do all of this with a natural grace. His mind must run on multiple tracks. He is constantly updating his extensive wine list. He runs the front of the house as well as the kitchen to ensure that his guests are enjoying their dining experience. He is like a quarterback who knows the strengths of his team and makes sure they work together as one. “There have been two people who have influenced me the most in my passion for cooking,” explains Burks. “First, my mother. Growing up we moved all over the coun- try. Every state we moved to my mother learned that region’s recipes. She was a wonderful cook and that is where I began my love affair with food. Dale Wamstad, founder of Del Frisco’s, III Forks, and Silver Fox Steakhouse, was the biggest influence on my cooking professionally.”


Burks and his dad went in as partners on what now may be one of the most popular restaurants in Frisco. Randy’s Steakhouse is the longest running, family-owned and operated restaurant in the booming city. “When we opened the restaurant in 1993, Frisco was a small town. We opened serving chicken fried steak and meatloaf, which seemed perfect for this small commu-


nity,” remembers Burks. “However, as Frisco has grown, our restaurant evolved into the prime steakhouse it is today.” Randy’s Steakhouse is strategically locat- ed in the middle of the rapidly growing area around the new Toyota world headquarters and the new home of the Dallas Cowboys’ headquarters. Housed in a structure built in 1869, it took Burks and his father a year to turn the old building into a restaurant. “When we first bought the house it was a residence owned by Vivian McCallum. The first time I walked through it I was able to envision everything. I envisioned the kitchen in the garage and each room a dining room full of guests,” says Burks.


The biggest change made to the struc-


ture was when Burks built an addition in 2001. The historical society approved the plan because Burks was re-creating an addi- tion that was left on Preston Road when the home was put on logs and pulled by oxen to its current location in 1903. Today, Randy’s Steakhouse has a charm- ing, historical look and feel, with rooms filled with antiques, vintage wallpaper and lighting. Smaller rooms, which were once bedrooms, serve the restaurant well for a private dinner or an intimate setting. There are many traditions and memories inside Randy’s Steakhouse. Framed family portraits line the walls. The overall feel is one of Southern hospitality. There is a lovely patio in the professionally landscaped backyard for outdoor dining. The restaurant often hosts business dinners, rehearsal dinners and large family gatherings. Randy’s Steakhouse offers many steakhouse


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