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among many others. These individuals review our curricu- lum and provide feedback for revisions to keep our instruction current. Yet another opportunity to stay connected to our industry is through our hosting of regular portfolio critiques where our students go to professional environments, like Sutherland Home, to present their com- pleted portfolios for valuable feedback. Our Career Services department hosts a job fair at the start of each term and coordinates at least a dozen em- ployers to visit with students on campus to recruit for internships and paid positions.


Do you have any success sto- ries from past students? An example of a graduate


DSD 26


Design Studios III, IV and V; and Interior Design Professional Practices.


In addition to the courses, how do you prepare students for the interior design indus- try?


A critical component of the


Wade College experience is the creation of a portfolio of student and professional work for the Professional Portfolio Critique (PPC). For successful completion, this process not only requires students to critically examine their work but, perhaps more importantly, dictates that the students take a stance on interi- or design and their future place within the industry. Through the PPC process, graduating students present their work to a panel of leading industry professionals for critique and feedback.


How is Wade College involved with the local design commu- nity?


The best example of this is in our hiring practices. We continually staff our courses with working industry profes- sionals who work in residential and commercial firms and desire to spend an evening, or two or three, a week with us! Currently, we have on staff Kurt Ortley, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, an architect at Designkor; Joshua Metzger, M. Arch, RID, AIA, a designer at Gensler; and Josh Moore, NCARB, LEED, a design applications manager at Perkins+Will. Additionally, we have an advi- sory board made up of industry professionals, like Steve Waddill of Waddill Group, Lisa Robison of Dwell with Dignity, and Pamela Davidson, an alum and former senior store designer at JC Penney,


who really used her dual major in merchandising and design is Pamela Davidson, class of 2007. Currently, she is a senior design- er at bkm Total Office of Texas where she directs the planning, designing and furnishing of commercial interior design projects. After graduation she was a senior store designer at JC Penney corporate where she was responsible for store renovations and installations. Today, Pamela sits on the college’s interior de- sign advisory board where she provides feedback on curriculum and program outcomes.


What future plans do you have for the interior design course? We are currently moving for-


ward with plans for full CIDA ac- creditation. We were one of two schools nationally that received candidacy status in 2015, recog- nizing Wade College as being able to receive full accreditation within five years.


What trends do you see tak- ing place in interior design? The greatest trend I see is the


growth of social responsibility within the profession and the integration of emerging technol- ogy to meet these needs. This responsibility may be demon- strated, for example, from the selection of environmentally conscious materials to a pro- bono project for a homeless shelter. The inherent question within almost all professions today is how technology can be utilized not just to perform the task at hand, but how technolo- gy can, in fact, improve process- es and outcomes.


How has design changed in recent years? And, how have you had to adjust the school’s teaching to keep up with the industry?


The biggest change that has impacted our program is a real desire to be licensed in the field. We transitioned our national kitchen and bath curriculum to the more holistic Council of Interior Design Accreditation standards. This forced us to real- ly evaluate our programs at both the associate and bachelor’s lev- els and expand instruction well beyond the residential focus we once had. Addressing issues like human factors and ergo- nomics, environmental systems, cultural aspects of design like the design of kitchens for kosher households, as one example, has really pushed the rigor and global focus of our program. 2


WADE COLLEGE


MERCHANDISING AND DESIGN 1950 N. Stemmons Freeway, Suite 4080


Dallas, TX 75207 214-637-3530 wadecollege.edu


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