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DESIGN PROFILE


TEACHING THE FUTURE OF DESIGN wade college offers degrees for interior designers


BY DOUGLAS KING


of Arts degrees in merchandis- ing and design, with concentra- tions in fashion design, interior design, graphic design/visual communications, and merchan- dise marketing/management. The college is also supported by the Council of Interior Design Accreditation.


DSD 24


Founded in 1962 with only 10 students by Sue Wade, a fashion model, buyer and mer- chandiser for Neiman Marcus, Wade College was originally called Miss Wade’s Fashion Merchandising College. The opening day course offerings included fashion merchandising and professional modeling. As the institution grew a move was necessary from the Turtle Creek location to its home at Dallas Market Center. In 1971 the curriculum shifted to full-time programs in merchandising and design.


John Conte, executive vice


president of Wade College, discusses the history and future


of this valuable design resource in Dallas.


What is the mission statement of Wade College? Wade College is a privately


sponsored college that offers associate and baccalaureate de- gree programs in merchandising and design. The college is a teaching institution that empha- sizes specialized professional study in fashion, interior and graphic design, and merchan- dising. The college is committed to serving the changing require- ments of the merchandising and design fields and prepares its students for excellence in their career fields by recruiting


knowledgeable faculty who are hired directly from industry and who own the responsibility to continually update curriculum and ensure that our facilities and equipment remain current.


What is the history of the school? Wade College was granted


accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges in 1985. In the early 2000s, the college expanded to its current two-site campus with- in the Dallas Market Center and neighboring Infomart Building. The college currently offers ac- credited Associate and Bachelor


What courses comprise the interior design curriculum? The interior design curriculum covers a diverse framework of skill sets. Courses may focus di- rectly on materials and systems or provide a studio environment in which students work through residential and commercial design challenges. Students also receive a solid business man- agement foundation, providing them with associated skills related to the management of an interior design office within a global marketplace and building the necessary foundation for working in a real-world setting. Specific interior design courses at the associate level include: Introduction to Interior Design; Space Planning; Design, Drawing and Presentation; Interior Studio I and II; Interior Materials and Systems; AutoCAD; and Revit. At the bachelor’s level, our interior design courses include: Lighting Design; Construction & Detailing; Environmental Systems and Controls; Human Factors and Ergonomics; Color Theory in Interior Design; Interior


Photograph by Holger Obenaus


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