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DESIGN EDITOR’S PICKS


A BOOK WITH A VIEW


DSD 20


Summer reading lists began with the assigned reading from high school teachers, forcing students to spend their days engrossed in pages of classic novels. While Adriana Hoyos’ A Passion for Design is not a book you would read poolside or at the beach, this is most definitely a book that every designer and artist should spend time with. Nearly 300 pages of stunning photography capture the impeccable work of Hoyos’ de- sign. Most pages and spreads offer full bleed, borderless views of interiors for residential and commercial work. There is also a wonderful chapter cov- ering Hoyos’ furniture design process and her collections, all captured in amazing photography. Hoyos is one of the leading


international figures in con- temporary interior design. Her work crosses borders and can be found in Latin America, the United States and around the world. The popularity of her


furniture design allowed her to open a design studio in Miami and furniture showrooms in the Dallas Design District, Dania Beach and in Ecuador, Venezuela, Chile and Peru. Born in Colombia and raised in Ecuador, Hoyos’ design aesthetic is deeply rooted in Latin American style and is also influenced by her extensive travel. But, her work transcends borders and is rich in familiar tone and style to other classic design standards, such as Prairie School and Craftsman, while retaining its own unique and luxurious form. Her furniture collections would fit as naturally in a New York loft as they would in a beachfront tropical home.


For any student or lover of design, and certainly for any- one looking for inspiration, A Passion for Design is one book that should find its place in your library. adrianahoyos.com, 214-613-4149


THE PLEASURE OF PAPER


Paper, the silent workhorse of the publishing industry. Hundreds of sheets are used for every book and magazine, but in the hands of artist Béatrice Coron the utilitarian product becomes something so much more: a focus point, a work of art.


“For the last 20 years, I have been exploring visual story- telling in artist books, paper cutting and public art,” explains Coron. “Collecting memories from individuals and communi- ties, I stage narrative allegories in silhouette to create a dia- logue with the viewer in playful fantasies.”


One of her latest creations, available from LuminArté Fine Art Gallery, is titled Memory Holes. The “book” is a limited edition of nine hand-cut works of art. Cut from Arches paper,


this visual chronicle records ar- chetypal stories that transcend time and space. The intricate detail is stunning to view di- rectly, but when light is added a dazzling array of shadows spreads across any surface, and Coron’s work takes on a multidi- mensional feel. Coron’s personal history has fueled her curiosity for stories and made her question her perception of realities. “I have been fascinated by the relation of people to their space and the sense of belonging,” she says. “Using paper-cutting, where everything is cut from a single piece of Tyvek or other paper types, the profusion of individual stories makes a coherent whole world.” One can only imagine the


effort that goes into cutting out the excruciating detail in each piece, but the end result is both whimsical and entrancing. “My goal is to invite the public to pause and bring their own ideas, finding personal interpretation to reclaim their imaginative powers,” Coron says. In this, the artist truly suc- ceeds. luminartegallery.com, 214-914-4503


Photographs by Holger Obenaus


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