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HOMES BUILDER


Opposite: Ellerman notes that the beam ceiling alludes to a time in history when structures were built and framed out of timbers instead of modern sawn wood. A Rosemary Hallgarten rug from David Sutherland covers the master bedroom floor. All furniture custom-made by Collins Interiors.


Right: Ellerman describes this bath- room, with its vaulted ceiling and timber-framed dormers, as the most amazing he’s ever built. The walls are paneled with tongue and groove as is the master ceiling. The mosaic floor is marble designed by Collins Interiors using tile from Ann Sacks.


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office above. Ellerman created identical stair treads carved with a computerized aided machine, then stacked one on top of another in a fashion that rotates the spine out of the way from where you walk. In this way, the stair is more comfortable to climb than a typical spiral staircase. Another, yet more playful, multistory feature—a fireman’s pole—leads from a third-floor children’s loft to a second-floor playroom. Adjacent to this com- mon loft, two separate private lofts accommodate children’s sleepovers.


The 28-by-28-foot playroom


presented an engineering chal- lenge, however. This expansive space needed to support the heavy, multicolored, reclaimed Ludowici clay tile roof above it. An exposed timber-framed trestle that resembles a wood- framed bridge answered the call. “This not only allowed us to transfer the roof weight around this open space, but made for a striking open ceiling,” Ellerman says.


Another challenge facing the builder was the client’s desire for heavy stone walls with arched


passageways on the main floor, which were not anticipated in the originally designed home. It was too late to add concrete foundations inside a partially constructed house, so Ellerman’s team devised a solution. They installed strategically located supportive steel beams into the floor upon which the stone walls and arches could be built. Due to the home’s high elevation, the builder foresaw a potential hazard—lightning— and installed a protective mechanism to shield the home against strikes. Such thought- ful planning, combined with creative artistry, resulted in the


fruition of a home built with brilliance and beauty. “I’m very honored when people place their trust in us to create their most personal possession,” Ellerman says. “I’m not cut from the same cloth as most homebuilders. I’m an artist and a very hands-on boutique builder. We provide a very high level of personal attention to our clients and their homes and have an immense capacity for detail. In the end, I am certain my advice [to pause, reflect and redirect] was my most valuable contribution to what is now a very personalized home for my client.” 2


ELLERMAN HOMES P.O. Box 12322


Dallas, Texas 75225 214-750-7881


ellermanhomes.com


STOCKER HOESTEREY MONTENEGRO ARCHITECTS 4514 Travis St., Suite 302 Dallas, Texas 75205 214-252-3830


shmarchitects.com


COLLINS INTERIORS Dallas Design District 1500 Dragon St., Suite 170 Dallas, Texas 75207 collins-interiors.com


Denise Henry is a freelance writer based in Ohio. Contact her at dlhen1058@gmail.com.


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