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Daventry Hill School FEATURE


Capturing careers ideas in a box


Innovative ways to bring careers advice to children when school visits are on hold are being put in place by Daventry Hill School in Northamptonshire. Daventry Hill is a co-educational, all-through (ages four to 18) SEND


school for students with cognition and learning diffi culties. One of the school’s main curriculum drivers is employability and addressing the national issue that only 5.9% of people with SEN (Special Educational Needs) gain meaningful and paid employment. Prior to the pandemic, visitors from industry were encouraged into


the school, and students took an active role within the wider community, something that proved to be incredibly eff ective, allowing students to actively engage with professionals and immerse themselves into an industry specifi c experience to develop a greater understanding. In order to keep that momentum going, the school is currently


developing a refreshing innovative idea to create Careers in a Box, which will support bringing the industry into the classroom through developing sensory toolkits. Each box is sector themed, and it is fi lled with specifi c industry


activities, equipment and relatable items that help bring that industry to life for the students, for example uniform, health and safety equipment, tools, story-time text and tasks students can complete within the classroom linked to that industry. T e school, which opened in 2016 off ers a personalised education


for students with cognition and learning diffi culties while assisting families to support their children’s journey into adulthood. T e delivery of employability education starts as soon as young people walk through


16 ALL THINGS BUSINESS


the door, using a creative approach to delivering through enterprise, role play, entrepreneurship, employer engagement, core competency skills development, self-awareness and much more. T e vision is that the vast majority of things


the school does has an employability focus that is meaningful to each individual student. Stacey Drake, Careers and Employability Leader


at Daventry Hill School, said: “T e employment statistics are even more alarming when you learn that over 65% of people with an additional need want and are able to work, but have just not had the support to be able to get there. “T is is the reality of life after school for adults


with learning barriers, who have so much to off er employers from multiple sectors. “Career in a Box has already received great


support from some wonderful local employers including Ensafe, Amazon, RS Components, Wilmott Dixon, Elysium Healthcare, Wincanton and Cummins. Without their generosity we know we wouldn’t have been able to get the idea off the ground.” The school would love to hear from any


businesses that may want to get involved. T e goal is to have a whole library of diff erent industries for young people to explore, eventually being able to off er things like 360-degree tours of workplaces, images and Q&A sessions with people from that sector to really bring the box to life.


If you would like to fi nd out more or off er support to Daventry Hill School contact Stacey Drake, Careers and Employability Leader at S.drake@daventryhillschool.org.uk


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