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proud members of the Girls’ Day School Trust (GDST), a group of 25 schools which, like us, are centres of excellence in the teaching of girls. Our home-schooling process, called Guided Home Learning, has thrived because of our access to GDST-wide online enrichment programmes, and the pedagogical support of many hundreds of like-minded colleagues around the country. In addition, our resident expert Consultant Teacher has also worked to develop our feedback methodologies, with much now delivered orally to students via technology. T e standing of computer science as an academic discipline has


been given a boost in recent years. Famously, Bill Gates once criticised the UK for concentrating too much on the applications of technology and not the deeper understanding of coding and algorithms that is essential for developing the next generation of technical innovators. We took the step of incorporating Computing as a subject into Mathematics and giving it dedicated curriculum time from the youngest year groups in our Junior School. T is has meant that computational thinking has been placed at the heart of the curriculum and has led to healthy uptake at public exams in the subject itself. However, the belief that, as digital natives, our young people should


be able to pick up IT creation skills as easily as learning a new computer game, ignores the fact that without clear guidance they will generally only approach this when they have to. As a result, they may lack standard digital competencies, such as formatting documents, ordering fi ling systems, using spreadsheets, and creating intuitive presentations and websites. At Northampton High, the Digacy programme also acts as a safety net to ensure that these functional IT capabilities are not lost. All pupils develop these skills at the most suitable time in their education, and in the most suitable academic discipline. For example, the website


ALL THINGS BUSINESS


skills learned in the 360-degree Me ePortfolio are developed in Humanities lessons as a key part of our transferable skills agenda. EdTech is with us to stay and we are confi dent it will help our pupils to thrive in the future, but technology is not an answer in itself. We may be moving into a world of self-driving cars and intelligent fridges, but some things will never change. It is the human connection transcending the digital, the understanding, guidance and perseverance of our teachers, that will allow students to fi nd their individual paths in this changing world.


To fi nd out more about Northampton High School call 01604 765765 or visit www.northamptonhigh.co.uk


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