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IRC D▲T▲ collection worksheet


Use this form to note data to enter into the application form, in metres or kilograms. THIS IS NOT THE APPLICATION FORM. See page 42 for application information Please see the notes on other Application pages in this Yearbook.


For information on taking data from an ORC or ORR certificate please see www.ircrating.org HULL


RIG


Not required for standard hulls, see list on www.ircrating.org LH – length of hull BO – bow overhang x – at bow h – at bow


SO – stern overhang y – at stern


Maximum beam Boat weight (empty) Bulb weight (if applicable)


Required even for standard hulls, to determine correct version: Maximum draft


Main mast:


P – mainsail hoist E – mainsail outhaul J – foretriangle base FL – forestay length


STL – spinnaker tack length Mizzen mast:


PY – mizzen hoist EY – mizzen outhaul


LLY – staysail luff LPY – staysail LP


Minimum draft (lift keel)


SAILS Obtain from your sailmaker, other rating certificate (eg. ORC, ORR) or see simple measurement guides on www.ircrating.org


Mainsail:


MUW – 7/8 width MTW – 3/4 width MHW – 1/2 width


Largest symmetric spinnaker SLU – luff


SLE – leech SFL – foot


SHW – half width


Largest asymmetric spinnaker SLU – luff SLE – leech SFL – foot SHW – half width


OTHER DETAILS & NOTES Spreaders (sets, including jumpers) Aft rigging: no of stays or sets of stays Spreader sweep Y/N


NOTES:


Largest headsail: HLU – luff length


HLP – luff perpendicular HUW – 7/8 width HTW – 3/4 width HHW – 1/2 width


HLUMax – longest luff length of any headsail that may be used when racing


SAILS NOTES:


Engine make/model


Propeller blades & type (e.g. 2 blade fixed) Pole type (e.g. spi pole, sprit, tacked on deck)


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