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Project number 000s US


MEXICO BRAZIL CANADA


COLOMBIA


Capex ($bn) US


BRAZIL MEXICO CANADA


CHILE


LATEST INVESTMENTS


AUTOMOTIVEOEM DRIVINGTHECLEANREVOLTION Mercedes-Benz USA, a subsidiary of Germany-based Daimler, will open a new logistics centre in Alabama. The centre, set to be located opposite Mercedes-Benz Drive, will serve as a storage and sequence facility for parts used in electric vehicle production. The facility will create 373 new jobs and is expected to be completed by July 2022.


ENGINESANDTURBINES INVESTINGINAMERICA Rolls-Royce Power Systems, a subsidiary of UK-based Rolls-Royce Group, is to invest $13.9m to expand its site in Minnesota. The company will add a new research and development building and expand its MTU power generation manufacturing facility. It will add 2600 sqmto the existing assembly hall and create 20 new manufacturing jobs. The final phase of the expansion is scheduled for completion in September 2021.


FOODANDBEVERAGES PETFOODPLANT Pet food producer Nestle Purina PetCare, a subsidiary of Switzerland-based Nestle, is set to invest $160m to expand its pet food plant in Silao, Mexico. The project will add new production lines, increasing capacity up to 285,000 tonnes per day of dry product. The company also invested $550m to build a new facility in Ohio, to


serve the US market, creating an expected 300 jobs.


METALS BALLEXPANDSINBRAZIL US-based Ball, a manufacturer of metal packaging products, is set to invest $90m in a new production unit in Frutal, Brazil. It will be the company’s 11th plant in the country and will have a capacity for 1.5 billion cans per year. The new facility is scheduled to commence production in quarter four 2021, serving the domestic market.


PHARMACEUTICALS EXPANDINGOPERATIONS Roche Canada, a subsidiary of Switzerland-based Roche Group, is investing $500mto establish a Global Pharma Technical Operations site at its headquarters in Mississauga, Canada. The firm will invest $500minto the project through to 2025. It has created 200 jobs and will create a further 300 jobs by 2023.


SOFTWARE&ITSERVICES TIKTOK’SCANADIANGROWTH TikTok, a social networking platformwhich operates as a subsidiary of China-based ByteDance, is planning to expand its presence in Canada. It forms part of the company’s wider plans to expand its global engineering team, adding approximately 3000 engineers in Canada, Europe, Singapore, as well as the US by 2023.


This investment news and data has been provided by fDi Markets, a crossborder investment tracking service that is part of The Financial Times Ltd’s fDi Intelligence division (www.fdiintelligence.com)


STATS


AMERICAS TOPCOUNTRIES FOR GREENFIELDFDI BY PROJECTNUMBER (2003- 2019)


10 15 20 25


0 5


Source: fDi Markets December 2020/January 2021 www.fDiIntelligence.com


AMERICAS TOPCOUNTRIES FOR GREENFIELD FDI BY CAPEX (2003-2019)


200 400 600 800 1000


0 Source: fDi Markets


Americas L


Viewfromthe


ookingtwodecades forwardatthefutureof


economicdevelopment andFDIintheAmericas, I’veidentifiedfivemajor


topicalfactorsthatwillimpactFDI decision-making. Firstly,demographictrendswill


includeslowerpopulation growthand ageingworkforces. Globalmigration will increaseandimmigration policy willbeincreasinglyimportantaspart ofabroadereconomicstrategy. Population diversity willbe increasinglyacceptedandvalued. Secondly,workforcetrendswillbe


dominatedbytheimpactsofIndustry 4.0technologies.Specific skill shortagesandredefinedoccupations willdemandmoreadaptiveeducational systemsandmassiveon-the-job re-training,varyinggreatlybysector. Thirdly,economicandfiscal


challengeswillbeintertwinedmore thaneverinthepost-Covid-19decades. Countrieswillbechallengedtorecover fiscal stability,redistributeincomesto supportconsumerpowerandsocial cohesion,whilealsofacilitating investmentandeconomicexpansion. Fourthly,environmentalrisksand


their mitigation willcontinueto grow inimportance.Climatechange,water shortages, habitat destructionand specieslosswill increasingly influence investmentdecisions,aswillthe infrastructure,energyandtechnology adaptations that follow.Sustainability willbemoredeeplyimplicatedin cross-bordertradedecisions. Finally,governmentpolicy-making


willbehugelytested.Battlesare alreadybeingwagedbetweenfree marketcapitalisteconomiesandmore centralised,technocratic,managed economies.Thisincludesbroader issuesofdemocracy, politicaland economicfreedoms.Trump-inspired populismandnationalismwillbe reorientedunderJoeBiden’sdomestic andforeignpolicies,prompting reconsiderationinothercountries. China’sinfluenceintheregionthrough state-ledinvestment,debtfinancingof infrastructureandotherpolicieswillbe aconstantunderlyingconsiderationfor publicandprivateactors.■


Gregg Wassmansdorf is senior managing director, consulting, at Newmark Knight Frank, a global real estate services firm. He is a member of the Site Selectors Guild. Email: gwassmansdorf@ngkf.com


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