search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
REGIONS EUROPE


Stockholm:the future ofwomenin tech


THEMAYORSPEAKS: ANNAKÖNIG JERLMYR


THE CITY’S MAYOR WANTS HALF ITS UNICORNS TO BE FOUNDED BY WOMENWITHIN A DECADE. DANIELLE MYLES REPORTS


I


n recent years, Stockholm has earned the reputation of being a ‘unicorn factory’. Sweden’s capital claims to have produced


more billion-dollar start-ups per capita than any other region outside of Silicon Valley, having produced the likes of Spotify, Klarna and Skype. Its mayor, Anna König Jerlmyr, says the


groundwork for its rise as a tech hub was laid three decades ago. “At the beginning of the 1990s, we had a tax break for residents to buy personalcomputers,” she says. “That was ahuge reform and meant that everyone had a com- puter at home.” It made Swedes early adopters of new technologies and attracted companies looking to test their solutions in a digital- friendly country. Today, a bigger factor underpinning the


city’s tech success is its culture. Ms König Jerlmyr believes Stockholm’s collaborative environment and open mindset have helped it attract and retain talent. “Our unicorns are still here and they are investing in new compa- nies, new entrepreneurs and new start-ups,” she says. “Companies tell me they can attract talent as we have flat hierarchies and we are transparent. You can be gay, you can be trans — ‘tolerance’ is the wrong word — we are very open to everyone.” She observes that workers increasingly


choose where in the world they want to live, before choosing which company they want to work for. Accordingly, she strives for Stockholm to be a city that operates according to the values of openness, transparency and freedom.


Female-foundedunicorns While Sweden is known for its leadership in gender equality, Ms König Jerlmyr has a close eye on the gender gap that persists in the tech


THE NEXT STEP FOR STOCKHOLMWILL BE TO DEVELOPASUSTAINABLE FINANCE CENTRE


June/July 2021 www.fDiIntelligence.com


sector. She’s set the lofty goal of having half Stockholm’s unicorns founded by women within the next decade. To achieve this, she wants to work with investors to get more capi- tal behind female tech entrepreneurs, while laying the foundations for future generations. The city runs programmes within schools that encourage girls to pursue studies in maths and introduce them to alternative role models. “We need to see young girls wanting to be engi- neers,” she says. Stockholm’s reputation as a place where


women can thrive also extends to town plan- ning. Ms König Jerlmyr is a champion of femi- nist urbanism, a movement based on the idea that a public space that draws women and chil- dren is a safe place for all. “We work with prop- erty owners, shop owners and others to have this feminist perspective — to see what activi- ties or changes are needed to make areas more attractive to women,” she says.


Post-pandemic positives Stockholm has strong sustainability credentials that date back to 1976, when it adopted its first environmental programme. The city is now aiming to become a world-leading city for elec- tric vehicles by 2030. In the meantime, Ms König Jerlmyr wants to learn from the pan- demic and encourage flexible working to improve quality of life and reduce traffic con- gestion. “Building new infrastructure is expen- sive and not good for the environment,” she says. “We should use what we have in a much cleverer way.” Sustainability is also at the heart of the


city’s finance ambitions. “The next step for Stockholm will be to develop a sustainable finance centre to collaborate, or compete, with London in funding the race to net-zero.” Indeed, another silver lining she sees emerg- ing from the pandemic is increased co-opera- tion within Stockholm and further afield. “There ismuch more collaboration now. Those that used to compete—be it cities, countries or property owners — now collaborate much more as we face the same challenges.” However, the city’s friendly rivalry with Denmark’s capital Copenhagen continues, she notes.■


75


CURRICULUMVITAE ANNA KÖNIG JERLMYR


2018 Stockholm Mayor


Previously Leader of the opposition, Stockholm


CITYPROFILE STOCKHOLM


Population 975,551 (31 December 2020)


Main industries Service industry, technology


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88