search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ASIA-PACIFIC REGIONS


CHINA’S GROWINGMIDDLE CLASSHASMEANTMOREDOMESTIC TOURISTS REAL DISPOSABLE INCOME HAS GROWNIN STEP WITH THENUMBER OF DOMESTIC TOURISTS


Source: Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), National Bureau of Statistics of China


increasing share of the country’s post-Covid tourism population. Digital-only bookings and check-ins


through online travel agencies such Ctrip or Qunar have been available for some time but recently hotels have understood digitally native consumers’ desire for consolidation. Both for- eign and hotel operators have partnered with WeChat to attract China’s social media genera- tion, and in June 2020, Hong Kong-based Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group launched an integratedWeChat function for its Chinese cus- tomers, enabling them to book any Mandarin Oriental hotel worldwide via the platform. “We are the first luxury hotel group to ena-


ble this combined booking and payment func- tionality on China’s preferred social media and e-commerce platform,” Jill Kluge, chief market- ing officer, said in a statement. Meanwhile, Hyatt launched the Hyatt Mini


Program on its official WeChat platform in November 2019, while InterContinental part- nered with WeChat to open a smart hotel in Shanghai in 2018.


Ruralandredtourism Aside fromthe momentum towards urban lux- ury stays and digitisation, there has also been heightened interest on Chinese social media in rural tourism over the past year. In July last year, the Ministry of Culture and


Tourism listed 680 key villages for promoting rural tourism. Chinese internet phenomenon and vlogger Liziqi, who only uses traditional cooking and farming to sustain herself and whose YouTube channel has more than 2.3 bil- lion views, has also given many in China a taste for the simple life. Sam Huang, research professor in tourism


andservicesmarketing in the School of Business and Law, EdithCowanUniversity (ECU) in Perth, says since domestic tourism is used as a


June/July 2021 www.fDiIntelligence.com


barometer for the Chineseeconomy and society, this renewed interest in rural retreats reflects a broader societal shift. “Before 2012, China had more people living in the countryside and after 2012, we have more people living in cities than in rural areas. Because of the pandemic, people may value more rural tourist attractions, fresh air and less crowded places,” he says. Once travel restrictions ease, it is likely that


urbanites will swapChinese rural environments with destinations overseas,MrHuang supposes. But as Chinese consumers use their interna-


tional tourism budgets for trips around their homeland, another trend is emerging: ‘red’ tourism.Despite the glossy hotels and capitalist spirit, China remains a titular communist country. Ahead of July 2021’s 100-year anniver- sary of the Chinese Communist Party — the sin- gle party governing the country — the govern- ment has been promoting travel to sites with significance for the party’s history. “This discourse around China’s commu-


nist heritage is, and will be, a big part of China’s domestic tourism system,” Mr Huang says, adding that many heritage sites, such as the Jinggang Mountains and Yan’an, the alleged birthplaces of the Red Army and the Chinese communist revolution respectively, are in rural locations. Withconsumer boycotts resulting from per-


ceived anti-China sentiment among foreign brands, will red tourism and rising nationalism make Chinese tourists less inclinedto go abroad when restrictions ease? Ms Page-Jarrett says thatwhile Chinese consumers are patriotic, the rise in domestic tourism will probably not encroach on outbound tourism. “It’s important to remember that even with


the huge numbers of tourists we saw overseas before Covid-19, in 2018 only 10%of the Chinese population had passports,” she adds. “That number will only increase.”■


65


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88