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LATEST INVESTMENTS


AUTOMOTIVE FOTONDAIMLERSTAYSLOCAL Beijing Foton Daimler Automotive, a joint-venture subsidiary of Germany- based Daimler AG and China-based Beiqi Foton Motor which manufac- tures mediumand heavy-duty trucks, plans to produce heavy-duty trucks and tractor models at a new plant in Huairou district, Beijing, China. The company will investRmb3.8bn ($580m) to acquire new plants and to establish new infrastructure and production lines. Production is set to start in 2022 and will serve custom- ers in the domestic market.


COMMUNICATIONS AMAZONREACHESTOMELBOURNE Infrastructure web service provider AmazonWeb Services, a subsidiary of US-based Amazon, is to open a new Asia-Pacific cloud infrastructure regional hub in Melbourne, Australia. It is expected to open in the second half of 2022 and create up to 90 jobs by 2026, including datacentre opera- tives and technical engineers.


ZOOMDOUBLESUPINSINGAPORE US-based Zoom Video Communications, which develops a cloud-based video communication platform, is planning to double its datacentre capacity in Singapore.


ELECTRONICCOMPONENTS AMPEREXMAKESINDONESIAPLAN China-based Contemporary Amperex Technology, a lithium-ion battery producer, is investing $5.1bn to build a manufacturing plant in


Indonesia. This plant will manufac- ture electric vehicle batteries. Construction of the plant is set to start in 2021 with production esti- mated to commence in 2024.


FINANCIALSERVICES ICICIOPENSINNEPAL India-based ICICI Bank, which provides banking and financial services, has opened a representative office in Nepal. The new office will work closely with domestic banks in Nepal to facilitate investment, trade, payments and treasury business between the two countries.


FOODANDBEVERAGES McCAINOPENSINCHINA Canada-based McCain Foods, a frozen food company, has announced plans to construct a potato production facility in Xianyang, China. The $200mplant will be located at the Yangling Agriculture Hi-Tech Development Zone. It will be the company’s second facility in China and will serve the local market.


SEMICONDUCTORS ENTEGRIS’S$200MTAIWANPLAN US-based Entegris, a global leader in semiconductor contamination control products, is to open amanu- facturing facility in Kaohsiung, Taiwan to develop and produce filters for micro-contamination control, gas delivery systems and advanced chemistries. The company will invest $200m in the facility by 2025, creating 200 new jobs.


This investment news and data has been provided by fDi Markets, a crossborder investment tracking service that is part of The Financial Times Ltd’s fDi Intelligence division (www.fdiintelligence.com)


STATS


ASIA-PACIFIC TOPCOUNTRIES FOR GREENFIELDFDI IN BIOTECHBY PROJECT NUMBER (2003-2020)


100 120


20 40 60 80


0 Source: fDi Markets February/March 2021 www.fDiIntelligence.com


ASIA-PACIFIC TOPCOUNTRIES FOR GREENFIELD FDI IN BIOTECHBY CAPEX (2003-2020)


10


0 2 4 6 8


Source: fDi Markets 59


Asia T


Viewfrom


heUNstates that ine- qualities often are


exacerbatedbyage, andtheWorld Health Organization(WHO)


reported that southeast Asia’s pro- portion of peopleaged60orabove willbe20.3%by2050. Health prob- lemsthat elderly peopleexperience include non-communicable diseases (NCDs),mentalhealth injuriesand disabilities. Asianwomenremain disadvan-


taged. Facing job inequality, the elderly need training and employa- bility, aswell as improved pension in the absence of minimumwage laws. Individuals either must savemore while they are young orwork further into old age. In urban areas, housing design needs to cater to the growing elderly population, promoting their independence, health and produc- tive living. IncidenceofNCDsin Asia is grow-


ing. Froma social cultural perspec- tive, individualismhas gradually erodedthe Asianmoral obligation to care forandsupport their elderly parents.Hence, authoritiesneedto providemoreintegrated community healthandsocial care systems,and provide universal health coveragefor the elderly. TheCovid-19 vaccine rollout


across the Asia-Pacific region is also unequal.Notall countrieshavejoined the globalCovax scheme,andsome countries arestill undergoing clinical trials whileothershavestarted vacci- nation. Richer countries’ preordering has providedthempreferential accessandover subscription. Countries slow to vaccinate face growing infection rates,overwhelmed hospitals, further lockdowns,and slower regional investmentand economicrecovery.Cambodia, Laos andMyanmarareunlikely to achieve massvaccinationby2026. Asia is onlyasstrongasitsweak-


est link. Will itbeasinglecountryslow tovaccinate that re-infects the region fiveyearslater, or itsageingpopula- tionnotadequately provided for in their twilightyears thatmostimpacts the region?■


Lawrence Yeo is CEO of AsiaBIZ Strategy, a Singapore- based consultancy that provides Asia market research and investment/trade promotion services.


E-mail: lawrence@asiabizstrategy.com


Project number CHINA


SINGAPORE INDIA JAPAN


AUSTRALIA


Capex ($bn) CHINA SINGAPORE


SOUTHKOREA INDIA


VIETNAM


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