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GLOBAL CITIES OF THE FUTURE


GLOBALOUTLOOK


Still winning: Singapore is fDi’s Global City of the Future for the fourth time in a row


indicated a desire to move its econ- omy to a more environmentally sus- tainable model. In green develop- ments, Dubai’s clean energy strategy aims to generate 75% of its energy fromclean sources by 2050. Amsterdam edged past Dublin to


be awarded the best overall city in the Large Cities category. The city consistently ranks highly for connec- tivity, with one of Europe’s busiest seaports and one of Europe’s busiest transit hubs in the formof its airport. Amsterdam had the highest inward FDI per 100,000 people between 2015 and 2020; however, Dublin followed very closely behind. The two cities are both primed to benefit from any Brexit-related exodus of firms from London, as they havewell-established financial sectors. Indeed, the London Stock Exchange launched a new trad- ing hub in Amsterdam at the end of 2020 in order to prevent any disrup- tion to their European customers. Dublin can be viewed as a particular threat with its lucrative 12.5% corpo- rate tax rate, with the think tank New Financial reporting that Dublin has been the biggest beneficiary of Brexit relocations. Poland certainly appears to be


punching above its weight, with two Polish cities ranking in the top 25 overall locations. Wrocław was also awarded the top overall city in the Mid/Small Cities category. Poland is upholding its reputation of having a


well-educated workforce, coupled with good cost effectiveness. The country also has 14 Special Economic Zones, which allow inves- tors to benefit from lower taxes and other state aid. Australia continues to dominate


the Human Capital and Lifestyle rankings, with Melbourne ranking first, closely followed by Sydney and Adelaide in third and fourth place. However, health officials in Australia have said that the country is unlikely to fully reopen its borders during 2021, and this could have ramifica- tions for the country’s talent pool. Looking forward, the arrival and


rollout of vaccines is certainly cause for optimism. Unfortunately for cit- ies dependent on tourism, it is esti- mated by the United Nations World Tourism Organization that it could take until 2023 for the travel sector to have anything comparable to the volume of travel pre-pandemic. The rise of home-working has also offered a new incentive opportunity for locations. Countries such as Barbados and Bermuda are offering one-year resident programmes, hop- ing to attract the new generation of digital nomads. Locations across the globe certainly seem to be focusing their economic recovery efforts towards more digital and technol- ogy focused sectors, with a particu- lar emphasis on environmental sus- tainability. ■


February/March 2021 www.fDiIntelligence.com


TOP25OVERALL RANK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


CITY


Singapore London Dubai


Amsterdam Dublin


Hong Kong New York Shanghai Paris


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25


Tokyo Beijing


Abu Dhabi Bangalore Munich Wroclaw Zurich


Toronto Seoul


Houston Warsaw Chicago Moscow


San Francisco Vilnius


Montreal


COUNTRY Singapore UK


UAE


Netherlands Ireland


Hong Kong US


China


France Japan China UAE India


Germany Poland


Switzerland Canada


South Korea US


Poland United Russia US


Lithuania Canada


27


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