search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MODERNSLAVERY


GLOBALOUTLOOK


countries, is creating more trans- parency around modern slavery via various partnerships. One is with DowJones, which compiles watch- lists of sanctioned and high-risk individuals. “Blending that people data with Dun & Bradstreet’s busi- ness data is quite powerful. What we’ve learned is that there is over- lap between those involved in money laundering and businesses found to be involved in modern slav- ery,” says Chris Laws, the firm’s head of UK product and strategy. Another partnership is with soft-


ware firm Quantexa,which uses entity resolution, network genera- tion and data enrichment to identify the same entities across different platforms and create a single, dynamic view of suppliers. “This helps companies understandwho their supplier is and surfaces infor- mation that highlights relationships fromfurther downthe supply chain,” says chief product officer Alexon Bell. Stitching together cus- tomer and Dun&Bradstreet data, among other sources, creates action- able information. “For example, when a business is sold, the company they supply might not be notified,” he says. “If we find that the acquirer is linked tomodern slavery via other businesses, that willimmediately be flagged as a risk for this supplier.”


Gapin themarket The growing ecosystemof players assembling data or providing tech- nology to help businesses detect modern slavery and other ESG risks in supply chains is “a burgeoning industry”, according to Mr Bell. The pandemic could accelerate uptake. “One byproduct of Covid-19 is that businesses have had to rapidly onboard new suppliers,” says Mr Laws. “It’s forced themto become more efficient and that ultimately lends itself to a data-led approach.” Whilecompanies have a growing


numberof tools at their disposal, investors have been somewhat neglected. Thisprompted a project between the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Lawand the Alan Turing Institute to identify the data solutions available to investors today, and where additional investment is needed.


FORCED LABOUR DOESN’T SIT STILL FOR YOUTO CATCHITANDTHRIVES BECAUSE OF ITS INVISIBILITY


Preliminary findings suggest


there ismuchroom for improvement. Modernslavery statements are inves- tors’ primary source of information, but Florian Ostmann, policy theme lead at the Alan Turing Institute, says their free text structuremakes them cumbersome to analyse. “One very promising tech appli-


cation is to use natural language pro- cessing to partially automate the analysis,” he says. Investor tools could also harness worker voice pro- grammes, which allow people deep in supply chains to anonymously report on working conditions. For businesses, this project is


making some reassuring discoveries. “It’s becoming increasingly clear that investors don’t expect compa- nies’ supply chains to be completely free ofmodern slavery, especially when they are long and run into developing countries,” says Irene Pietropaoli, a research fellowat the BinghamCentre. “But they do expect companies to be transparent about howthey are identifying and addressing these risks.” More broadly, Mr Laws believes


graph database technology, which power social media platforms Facebook and LinkedIn, is “an incred- ibly powerful tool for supply chain mapping”. There are various block- chain tools, but Mr Dillon believes firms must first invest in basic sup- ply chain transparency before they can have anymeaningful impact. Data and technology have great


potential in tackling modern slavery in supply chains. But for investor solutions there is a gap in the mar- ketwhich will only get bigger as their ESGfocus grows. “Investors showgrowing interest in modern slavery risks, so I don’t seemajor obstacles to the uptake of tools being developed, as long as they are user- friendly and address their informa- tion needs,” says Mr Ostmann. “It’s just that they aren’t there yet.”■


February/March 2021 www.fDiIntelligence.com 25


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96