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Sunny forecast: IDC expects that spend on cloud computing will triple to $76.1bn in 2023, from $26bn in 2019 Like the global market, south-east Asia’s


cloud industry is being driven by public cloud “hyperscalers”. “The term ‘hyperscale’ is used to describe


companies that havehuge data centre networks that are used to support amultitude of external clients,” says John Dinsdale, chief analyst and research director at Synergy Research Group. “The 20 companies that meet Synergy’s cri-


teria for a hyperscale operator includeAmazon, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Apple, Alibaba, Tencent and Baidu.”


Publicdemand It’s not just the private sector driving demand for cloud services. Demand by public institu- tions is set to growby an annual37%in the next five years, IDC figures show, particularly as gov- ernments transition towards e-governance and smart citymodels. For example, Vietnam is implementing a


national digital transformation programme by 2025, including the upgrading of 4G to 5G net- work services, the acceleration of digital pay- ments in the country, and the adoption of cloud services for all e-government services. “I expect the government to update its guidelines to increase usage of the public cloud


August/September 2020 www.fDiIntelligence.com


to increase operational efficiency and agility as it moves along its digital transformation jour- ney,” says Siew Choon Liew, research manager at IDC Asia/Pacific. Despite the booming demand, it will be


hard for competing cloud infrastructure pro- viders to enternewmarkets in the region where any of their competitors already has a domi- nant position, as confirmed by IDC’s Mr Lee. “If customers have already invested in peo-


ple, skills, independent software vendors and partner relationships, it will take something special to convince them to add to the environ- ment,” he says. ”For example, Australia will not see much of the investment coming from the BAT (Baidu, Tencent and Alibaba) trio, even though it is the second-largest cloud market after China in the region.” When Alibaba laid out its first serious


cloud-infrastructure investment campaigns in 2015, the then-president of its cloud division, Derek Wang, was very clear in his aims: “Our goal is to overtake Amazon in four years, whether that’s in customers, technology, or worldwide scale.” In 2020, the aimmust be to keep a firmgrip


on the Indo-Pacific market as the chasing US pack snaps at its heels.■


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