search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
REGIONS EUROPE


announcements are “great news” for the bor- ough, but maintains that the current focus for manysmall businesses is “recovery or survival”.


Homes,homes,homes Elsewhere,housingdevelopmentsare alsoonthe rise,suchasBeamPark,worth£1bn,andBarking Riverside, a development of 10,800 homes and new schools that will also welcome a 4.5km over- ground extension from Barking station. But as Anna Ward, senior research analyst


at Knight Frank, points out in a report on the borough’s regeneration, housing supply has still not been keeping pace. The number of homes built in the borough


over the previous three years, compared with local housing requirements, falls short, accord- ing to the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government assessment. Its 2020 assessment states that Barking and Dagenham scored 57%, delivering 1902 homes out of the required 3708. MsWard says that “historically, there hasn’t


been asmuch regeneration in terms of housing in [Barking and Dagenham] as other parts of London”, but is hopeful that the arrival of the freeport and transport developments will help it yield positive results.


Local community That said, Mr Rodwell is keen to avoid the “Stratford trap”, whereby gentrification is forced upon local residents. “We’re not allowing gentrification. What


wetalk about is the aspirationalworking class,” he says, stressing the importance of affordable housing andcommunity. “My biggest challenge is getting the govern-


ment to understand that if ever there was the right time to invest in the rebirth of this area, it’s now,” says Mr Rodwell, stressing the discon- nect between bringing in more than £2bn worth of investments and an ongoing dispute with the government over the council’s pro- posal for public transport at the Dagenham East station. “I’mdoing more than what I’ve been asked


to do, but if they don’t put in the right infra- structure I have to stop,” he says, “because I can’t ask people to [move into these] homes if they don’t have the right train stations, parks or doctor’s surgeries.” But he remains hopeful. “It’s about


vision,” he adds. “It’s all about people feeling that our vision links to their vision, and once they see that, it’s about relationship and trust.” ■


SPOTLIGHTONKATOWICE PARTNERCONTENT


Betafence, Infobip, LKQ, PubNub, SDWorx and TMFGroup. Another area in which Katowice ranks


highly is the quality of life it offers. Its superb medical, sports and recreation facilities, as well as a culture and entertainment-focused Culture Zone and a plethora of green areas and forests are a big lure for residents and newcomers alike. Its accessibility and high-quality transport


Katowice City Hall


KATOWICETRANSFORMATION ENTICES INVESTORS


Once best known for its heavy industry including coal mining and steel produc- tion, thesouthernPolish city ofKatowice has gained a new reputation as a hub for the business services sector. The city – and the wider Metropolis area –


isoneof the topfivehubs for business services inPoland. It is rankedthirdin the country for its investment potential for business services centres and ranks high out of 15 cities for its availability of talent, accessibility and coopera- tion with local universities. Now regarded as one of the greenest locations in the country, Katowice has cap-


turedtheimagination ofcompaniesandwork- ers alike, who appreciate its forward-thinking approach to business, its focus on IT services andits support for entrepreneursandstartups. All these factors are encouraging an


increasingnumber of firms tomove here, with an estimated 230,000 square metres of office space set to be completed in the city by the end of 2024. Global firms from 19 different countries


have been attracted to Katowice. Since early 2020,more thanadozennewinvestment pro- jects have been established here by compa- nies such as Ammega, AT&T, Guess, Hyland,


infrastructure are also big pluses for the highly skilled people that work in its tech sector. What’s more, those that live here say they


enjoy an active social and cultural life with plenty to do and see, frommajor global events such as the upcoming 2022 World Urban Forum to annual tournaments such as the Intel Extreme Masters and festivals including the Tauron Nowa Muzyka Katowice, the Off Festival and the Rawa Blues Festival.


Contact Investors Assistance Department oi@katowice.eu invest.katowice.eu linkedin.com/company/invest-in-katowice


Sponsored by


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96