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Thereal futureof healthcare


THE CHAIRMAN OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON CHINA ON THE NEED TO INNOVATE AND COLLABORATE


the healthcare system to find innovative approaches to more accessible, better health- care services. One of themis the ageing popula- tion. Take China for example: the latest data fromthe country’s 2021 census shows that peo- ple aged 65 or older account for 13.5% of the total population. According to a World Bank study, that percentage is projected to increase to 14%in 2025 and 26.1%in 2050. With increas- inglymore seniors asking for attentive care, the healthcare systemneeds to be prepared to not only address common diseases and causes of injury in the older population, but also work out customised solutions to deliver the prod- ucts and services to those who need them. In response to this growing need, it is


WILL SONG


body scans that render 3D images of patients’ organs or bone structures, holographic doc- tors beamed into the homes of patients for remote consultation. These, of course, are bold ideas that help


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push forward the technological frontier of healthcare. Some of them are even turning into real-life solutions to support doctors in delivering better care. But technology is not all the future is about: what we envision is lever- aging the power of innovation to create a future where everyone has access to high-qual- ity healthcare.


Meeting people’s needs The inherent driver for the ongoing advance of healthcare is the growing need for better health and wellbeing. This is especially true after more than 18 months of fighting against Covid-19. Around the world, people are putting more attention on healthcare — not only on protecting the population’s everyday health, but also on the medical services that are availa- ble in the hour of need. Apart from the societal impact from Covid- 19, a fewmajor demographic trends are urging


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f you bring up the topic of the future of healthcare, it is easy to think of those futur- istic scenes: robotic arms doing surgery,


encouraging to see that governments around the world are putting increasing emphasis on healthcare. In recent years, China has released a series of favourable policies to support the healthcare industry development. From the acceleration of innovative medical products and drugs approval, to reforming the national health insurance schemes to advance health- care accessibility and affordability, policy-mak- ers are determined toimprove healthoutcomes for the Chinese population by leveraging the power of innovation.


Improving healthcare In healthcare, there is a wide range of scenar- ios that can be improved with innovative mod- els and new technologies. Frompharmaceuti- cal research and development (R&D) to diag- nostics and treatment, from hospital manage- ment to personal health monitoring, innova- tion is bringing enormous changes to the healthcare landscape to provide better access and outcomes, with higher efficiency and lower cost, both for the patient and the health- care provider. The surgical revolution is a great example.


From traditional open surgery that generally requires large incisions, to minimally invasive surgery that is already commonplace today, surgical techniques have come in leaps and bounds over past decades, allowing surgeons to treat what was once thought untreatable. Today, one of the most exciting technological advances is robotic surgery. With the help of robotic arms operating inside the patient’s body, surgeons are granted enhanced visibility of the surgical site and canoperate withgreater


www.fDiIntelligence.com August/September 2021


Artwork by SamKerr


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