search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
GLOBALOUTLOOK RENEWABLES


fDi that CPPAs allow the company to “[work] with governments and util- ity suppliers around the world to help bring more new renewable energy projects online”. This, Amazon claims, has had a


positive benefit for other energy cus- tomers. “In Ireland, we were the first organisations to use CPPAs to bring renewable projects online and deliver clean energy to the Irish grid, at no cost to energy consumers,” the spokesperson added.


Economicimpactandvalue chains In May, Facebook released an Economic Impact Study focused on the US, in which it states its pro- grammehas resulted in $3bn domes- tic investment in renewables creat- ing roughly 40,000 construction jobs and 1000 operational jobs. According to a recentcommen-


tary fromthe IEA, big tech compa- nies could “make even greater use of their financial strength to under- write renewable investmentswhere they are neededmost: in developing andemerging economies”. Data demand will grow rapidly


in emerging economies over the coming decades, the report contin- ues, requiring new regional data centres to serve growing demand. Big tech’s purchasing of renewa-


ble energy has been largely concen- trated in areas where their data cen- tres are located: NorthAmerica and Europe. With an increasingnumber of data centres in India, Singapore and Taiwan, big tech’s influence as a corporate clean-energy buyer looks set to become more global. In April, Facebook signed a vir-


tual power purchase agreement (VPPA) with Singaporean energy pro- vider Sunseap, for solar energy from the country’s largest offshore float- ing solar farmin the Straits of Johor. In the samemonth, it signed a simi- larly structured agreement,whereby it does not own the renewable asset, but enters into long-termelectricity purchases, on a 32-megawatt wind project in the south-west Indian state of Karnataka. Urvi Parekh, director of renewa-


AMAZON,GOOGLEANDFACEBOOKBUYUP CLEAN ENERGY TOP 10 BIGGEST CORPORATE BUYERS IN THE US IN 2020 (GW)


Source: Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance


ble energy at Facebook, says that of big tech companies in general, “eve- ryone is identifying the local and regional issues that are changing and impacting the specific grid to decarbonise”. “Asia was one of themore chal-


lenging geographies to find suffi- cient volumes of renewable energy,” she says, stressing the need to come up with innovative solutions in land- constrained countries, such as Singapore, to deploy solar energy. Facebook has also announced it


aims to be net-zero across its value chain,whichMs Parekh character- ised as a “newhorizon” for Facebook. “I think on the electricity side,


the fragmentation of value and sup- ply chains is the hardest part of it. We’re going to have to do a lot of work,” she adds. Apple has announced a goal to


go carbon-neutral by 2030, in both its supply chain and its products. Apple could not be reached for com- ment on their renewable energy strategy.


Clean energyonthe hour Scrutiny over value chains is mir- rored by other commitments to scrutiny over energy consumption. Last September, Google set the ambitious target of being 100% pow- ered by clean energy on an hourly basis by 2030. While businesses can claim to be 100% renewable on an annual


August/September 2021 www.fDiIntelligence.com 39


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96