search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
AFRICAN TECHECOSYSTEMS OF THE FUTURE 2021/22 FDISTRATEGY


Keyboard warriors: Cairo’s tech scene won the city second place in the FDI Strategy ranking


stated that rather than a skills gap there is an experience gap, with Kigali having ample skilled graduates for entry level positions, but struggling to source senior engineers and manage- ment. However, as Kigali’s ecosystem develops, it is anticipated that this problem will be resolved. Rwanda is also in the process of


creating a Start-Up Act, which will provide incentivesand a policy frame- work which will accelerate Kigali’s tech ecosystem. Proposed incentives include tax breaks for local angel investors, residency programmes for high-skilled graduates and specific incentives for digital nomad workers. This follows Tunisia’s Start-Up Act, which was passed in 2018 and stream- lined the creation and liquidation of businesses, in addition to smoothing customs procedures and expanding technological infrastructure.


Accessing capital While reformed regulations are a useful and necessary step,many loca- tions are still struggling for access to capital. For locations without a well- developed financial sector and ven- ture capital (VC) network, growing their start-up ecosystem can be highly challenging. A joint public– private approach to capital appears to be the most effective, as private investors are more likely to start investingwhen the local government has a stake in the start-up investing landscape, lending the ecosystem more credibility and security. Cairo


April/May 2021


reported success with joint ventures between local and foreign VC firms. Co-investing with local VC firms pro- vides foreign counterparts with local knowledge and added reassurance. Within the start-up sphere, there


is growing interest in impact invest- ing. The opportunity for start-up eco- systems to develop while helping the local economy reach sustainable development goals is a significant benefit. GirlHype is a non-profit organisation established in Cape Townandworks to give girls from dis- advantaged backgrounds the skills to pursue careers in the tech industry. In Nairobi, AkiraChix has trained hundreds of youngwomenin coding. In March, founder Linda Kamau told Vogue that she wanted to ensure that women were not edged out of the tech space in Kenya, and wanted to correct the imbalance “beforeweend up at the Silicon Valley level”. The active inclusion of marginalised groups in tech ecosystemswill be cru- cial in ensuring the benefits of a digi- tal economy are felt by all. Cairo, Cape Town and Kigali offer


an exciting insight into the flourish- ing start-up ecosystems present in Africa. The rapid development of reg- ulations, financial markets and edu- cationacross these cities isanexciting signal of the commitment to support start-ups. With a young, entrepre- neurial population, growing interest fromprivate investors and improving technological infrastructure, Africa is the tech start-up sector’s oyster.■


RWANDA IS CREATING A START-UP ACT, WHICH WILL PROVIDE INCENTIVES AND A POLICY FRAMEWORK


37


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96