search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
RISINGECOSYSTEMS


for a quick exit, [instead they are] aiming to build not just billion-dol- lar-companies, but $10bn companies and beyond,” adds Mr Rabinowitz. However, Mr Vidra pointed out


thatmuch of the growth is happen- ing at the late-stage rounds. “Seed funding has been in decline. Anecdotally, serial entrepreneurs can raise more easily, and for first time founders, it depends on their prior experience andwhat vertical they are in.” Mr Myersdorf says someinvestors


are also changing their targets: “I see much more strategic investors and CVC [corporate venture capital] seek- ing innovative technologies.” While there is an understanding


that innovation is coming out of Israel, the ecosystemneeds to foster strategic partnerships to commer- cialise and scale-up the technology in the global arena, adds MrMyersdorf.


Keyverticals Unsurprisingly, and given the ecosys- tem’s ties with the defence industry, cyber security remains themost pop-


ular vertical, followed closely by fin- tech, mobility and digital health. Mr Vidra says the ecosystemis home to more than 430 cyber start-ups, accounting for $2bn in investment in 2020 alone. “Another trend in Israeli start-


ups that is less documented is the rise of successful consumer tech and gaming,” he notes. Indeed, Google’s 2013 acquisition ofWaze for a reported $1.1bn helped cement faith and confidence in the potential of start-ups in this space. RavitWarsha Dor, a partner at


Kamet Ventures, and the former head of innovation at the Israeli Ministry of Health, agrees that Tel Aviv has “a vibrant ecosystemthat is a fertile breeding ground for digital health start-ups”. “In recent years we have seen an


increase in collaboration between healthcare institutions, providers and professionals with the tech sec- tor. They are actively looking for new technologies to help with their daily challenges. “In parallel, experienced entre-


preneurs and leaders from the strong Israeli cyber and fintech industries are looking for more meaningful ways to ‘give back’ to their communi- ties, and sometimes even to solve or improve their personal and/or fami- lies’ health conditions, which has encouraged amove to the healthtech space,” adds MsWarsha Dor. The future of Tel Aviv’s ecosystem


is promising. Mr Vidra believes busi- ness-to-consumer start-ups will con- tinue to prosper. “Consumers have changed the way they spend their time and money, and Israeli entrepre- neurs are becoming aware of the big market opportunities in food, educa- tion and personal finance,” he adds. To fulfil its true potential, Tel Aviv


needs to becomea more attractive destination for international talent, findways of nurturing itsown, and strengthenties withthe global mar- ket tocommercialise innovation. If it does this well, it will certainly give its counterparts a runfor theirmoney.■


Yessi Bello-Perez is the co-host of the Rising Ecosystems podcast on fdiintelligence.com.


GLOBALOUTLOOK


April/May 2021 www.fDiIntelligence.com


17


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96