search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
GLOBALOUTLOOK CORPORATESTRATEGY


Pandemicpushes adoption of3Dprinting


COMPANYPROFILE


ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING SPECIALIST MATERIALISE BELIEVES COVID-19 HAS ACCELERATED DEVELOPMENT. ALEX IRWIN-HUNT REPORTS


lease of life.3Dprinting, commonly referred to as additivemanufacturing (AM),has beenin use since the 1980s, andalthoughthe technologyhas evolvedrapidly in recent years,mass adoptionis yet to be reached. Butnow, asmanufacturing leaders


A


seek to buildresilienceandflexibility into their supply chains,AMcould becomemore widespread thanever. “The pandemic suddenly con-


fronted people with the actual advantages of the technology,” says Peter Leys, the executive chairman of Belgium-basedAMspecialist Materialise. Since being founded in 1990 by


Wilfried Vancraen, Materialise has provided software solutions andAM services across industries including healthcare, automotive, aerospace and consumer goods. Mr Leys says the company has been “preaching” for decades about the potential to decentralise production using AM. “We are convinced that boards


and production managers are really thinking of reorganising their sup- ply chains and manufacturing lines to include 3D printing,” Mr Leys says. “Not just for the sake of including it, but for the strategic and sustainabil- ity advantages that it offers.”


sCovid-19 disrupted global sup- ply chains, a decades-old tech- nologyhas beengiven anew


An EY survey conducted in April


2019 indicated that there has been a significant increase in the number of businesses that seeAMas strategi- cally important. Some 20% of the 900 companies surveyed planned to integrate the technology into their business, up from4% three years ear- lier. Meanwhile, the percentage of businesses that had someexperience in applyingAMtechnology rose from24% to 65%.


Covid-19 solutions CNHIndustrial, amultinational pro- ducer of various capital goods, such as agriculturalmachinery, engines and commercial vehicles, has been usingAMduring the pandemic. After Covid-19 restrictions halted shipping of replacement parts from China to their plant in Zedelgem, Belgium, the company worked with Materialise to 3D print theminstead. “AMwas the fastest andmost cost-


effectiveway forward [and] was the onlyway to guarantee order fulfil- menton time,” LuigiNeirynck, the plant director atCNHIndustrial Zedelgem, said in awebinar organised by Materialise on December 3, 2020. In the fight against Covid-19,


companies across theAMindustry also helped to meet the demand for personal protective equipment and critical medical devices. These devices often needed to be highly customised to meet the needs of medical professionals. “We designed, together with pulmonolo- gists, oxygen masks that perfectly met their needs for Covid-19 issues,


and went ahead and 3D printed it,” says Mr Leys.


Strategic footprint Materialise has a vision to useAMtech- nology as ameans to“make theworld betterandhealthier”. Ithas expanded its footprint across 20 countriesworld- wide, including the US, France, Germany,AustraliaandChina. At its headquarters in Leuven,


Belgium,whichhosts one of the world’s largestAMfacilities, Materialise engages in rapid prototyp- ing—the first application ofAMtech- nology. This iswhere aphysical part, model or assembly isquickly fabri- cated using3Dcomputer-aided design. “Rapid prototyping is animpor-


tantandstablemarket, but not amar- ket withlots of growth,” saysMr Leys. Materialise uses its Leuvensite as a lab to test differentmaterialsand machines, to findout “the best techno- logical fit for a specific application”. Thecompany decidedmany years


ago thatonly one labwas needed for prototyping. ButonceMaterialise becomesinvolvedin a particularAM application, itbuilds facilitiesworld- wide “as close as possible to the point of sale, or point of care”, in line with its vision to decentralise production. Oneexample of this isMaterialise’s personalised knee guides – or3Dpre- operativemodels of patient’s knee joints that assist orthopaedic surgeons inmaking precise incisions – which thecompany produces in Belgium, Japanandthe US.Meanwhile, their factory in Polandproduces custom insoles for theEuropeanmarketandit


RAPID PROTOTYPING ISANIMPORTANT MARKET, BUTNOTAMARKET WITH LOTS OF GROWTH


12 www.fDiIntelligence.com April/May 2021


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96