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SNACKING EXPANDED (CONT.)


Snapshot: Sweet Baked Goods The comfort snack Consumers have deeply rooted attitudes about bakery products—associating them with home, comfort and family—so it is little wonder that bakery product sales make up 8% of the total US food and beverage market, at about $46B annually. But as consumer attitudes about eating shift toward health, Americans are generally becoming more demanding of their bakery products. They are also increasingly careful about what they eat. When it comes to sweet baked products, they tend to consume them (on average) at a slightly lower frequency than the other snack foods, at just under 10 times per month for adults and kids. Not surprisingly, these foods are consumed most as a dessert following a meal for both adult consumers (74%) and for children (79%) and most prominently after dinner. Taste and flavor are important criteria when adults buy these products for themselves, but when purchasing for a child, parents again tend to put more emphasis on nutritional value, although the child liking the bakery treat is also critical. When you’re talking sweet baked goods, both adult consumers and parents most often seek the same three attributes—natural, made with natural sweeteners, and made with organic ingredients—and all three are most important as shoppers buy for their kids. Parents typically seek these attributes because they view them as healthy. Benefits are an emerging priority in baked goods for consumers overall, but adults still place most importance on satiety, as well as on products that can improve mood or boost energy. Parents are now seeking long-term benefits from these products for their kids, such as boosting immunity and supporting bone and heart health.


Snapshot: Salty Snacks


Branching out for better snacks Even though the competition from sweet treats and snacks is ramping up, salty snacks are holding their own in the overall snacking market, with Packaged Facts predicting the market will reach $29B by 2022, as the category branches out into new taste and flavor combinations


BU WHAT’S IN STORE | 2020


that meet better-for-you standards. As noted earlier, savory flavors have a slight edge over sweet, so this bodes well for the salty snack category, which is by far the most popular as a between-meal snack. Like snack bars, consumption of salty snacks is frequent, with average use of these products at about 10 times per month for adults, and slightly higher at 11 times per month for children. Salty snacks are also the go-to solution for the afternoon nosh, with close to seven in 10 consumers saying they consume these types of snacks between lunch and dinner. Similar to bars, top purchasing criteria are dependent upon who’s buying and who’s eating—with the top two criteria of taste and nutrition for adults flipping in importance when buying for children, where nutrition trumps taste. In general, many of the top attributes for salty snacks are the same whether the consumer is shopping for themselves or their children. But when considering the most important qualities, naturalness is most important among both adults and parents. Parents seeking salty snacks for their kids also tend to find whole grains and organic ingredients important. When buying salty munchies for themselves, adults are most likely to avoid HFCS, followed by GMO ingredients, sugar and sodium. Parents, however, say they most often skip caffeine- containing products in this category by a wide margin. Overall, their reasons for these choices boil down to the fact that consumers prefer products that they perceive as natural, whether for themselves or their children. Nevertheless, respondents did say they pass on products with artificial sweeteners because of a perceived bad aftertaste, and they steer clear of GMO ingredients because they generally perceive them as bad. When it comes to kids’ snacks, think benefits. Generally, the importance of benefits in salty snacks is higher when buying for children than for adults. Satiety (keeping the snacker full until their next chance to eat), is the most important benefit for both adults and kids, followed by heart health.


Source: Cargill, www.cargill.com


© 2020 International Dairy Deli Bakery Association


Industry Landscape

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