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RETAIL SALES (CONT)


Fifth: MASS MERCHANDISERS HOLD STEADY IN 5TH PLACE


After the first four retail channels we track in the Retail Universe, natural market share drops into the single digits. Mass merchandisers such as Walmart and Target saw robust growth in natural organic, as both retailers reinvigorated their overall sales by spending heavily to increase online sales, in-store pickup and delivery services. Again, we see natural organic outpacing conventional growth, rising 7.32% in the mass channel, adding $373.6 million to reach $5.48 billion in sales, and a 6.59% natural market share.


Sixth: CLUB STORE CHANNEL IS VIBRANT


Close behind the mass channel, club stores captured a 6.3% market share, growing natural organic sales by 9.05%, or $435 million, to reach $5.24 billion. The largest slice of that growth— $352.7 million—came from Costco, which reported robust sales increases in fresh foods departments including produce and meats. During the year, Costco management regularly called out natural and organic as being the main drivers behind the growth of fresh foods.


ONLINE SALES


Retailers have begun reporting their online percentage of sales. While in many cases, we don’t know the makeup of these sales, whether they consist of natural organic products or not, it is interesting to see how online is gaining relevance, and how retailers are adopting an “omni-channel” approach to serving their customers. Walmart reports e-commerce makes up 1.4% of US sales, or $4.56 billion, and for its Sam’s club subsidiary, 1.3% of sales, or $764 million. Target’s e-commerce sales have increased to 5.5% of sales, or $3.9 billion, up from 4.3% of sales in 2017. GNC reports that its US


* Total units adjusted for 7,720 conventional supermarkets not carrying natural organic products ** US Pharmacy total units were updated for 2018 ALL SQUARE FOOTAGE AMOUNTS REFER TO GROSS LEASE AREA Source: Retail Insights® Info@RetailInsights.com Copyright© 2019 Retail Insights®


e-commerce revenue reached 7.2% of total sales, or $125.8 million. This, of course, would be a pure natural organic number, as it consists entirely of vitamins and supplements. Vitamin Shoppe reports its digital sales increased 26.2% in 2018.


THE NATURAL ORGANIC RETAIL UNIVERSE


Natural and organic sales in the US continue to outpace conventional foods, growing 2.6 times faster. One in eight dollars—$83.2 billion or 12.59% of the $660.9 billion in total food store sales— belongs to natural and organic products. There are 138.3 million square feet dedicated to natural organic products in the US, or 4.38% of the 3.16 billion square feet of GLA retail store space we track in the Retail Universe. We can conclude from this that natural organic products are three times as efficient for retailers to carry in their stores as conventional foods, and we expect they will continue to add to their assortments. Across the 114,644 stores we track in the Retail Universe, the average GLA retailers allocate to natural organic products is 1,207 square feet, which generates $725,890 annually, or $601.35 per square foot. All three of these metrics are at record levels.


WHAT’S IN STORE | 2020


Industry Landscape


10


© 2019 International Dairy Deli Bakery Association

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