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STUTTERING FOUNDATION CLASSROOM RESOURCES


Guidelines for Treating Children with ADHD


• Structure activities according to a consistent, organized schedule that the child has helped to create. Post these routines in the therapy room so that the child is aware of the schedule and what is expected of him or her. It is helpful to schedule in play breaks so the child knows that something fun is ahead.


• Make therapy personal by focusing on the child’s interests. For example, if a child is interested in sports, build the session around a game of football. You can use the rules of the game as content for discussion and create a reward system based on the number of yards a team advances or on touchdowns scored.


• Keep instructions simple, clear and concise. Present directions multiple times and have the child repeat them back before responding. This will lead to long-term retention of the material and increased learning.


• Provide visual cues, concrete examples and/or drawings to assist in comprehension. For example, by using the analogy of the garden hose, you may be better able to show how speech flow can be disrupted at various locations along the “hose,” such as the lips, the larynx, etc. With concrete examples, the child is better able to understand and retain the information.


• Use frequent praise and establish a reward system that changes over time to keep the child motivated and interested. Children with ADHD often crave attention and excel in positive environments where they are surrounded by support.


• Increase the child’s self-monitoring skills and awareness of how behaviors affect interactions with others. Focus on the child’s ability to accurately assess his speech in a variety of speaking situations ranging from simple to complex. Then teach problem solving skills to allow him to change these behaviors accordingly.


• Address overall communication skills. By introducing and modeling appropriate skills such as eye contact, volume, rate, listening skills yourself, you will help to increase the child’s confidence and self-esteem while reducing speech-related anxiety.


• To foster generalization of new skills, explore grouping the child with other children who have similar characteristics. The desensitization gained by such a meeting frequently reduces anxiety and promotes more fluent speech. It is also an optimal setting to practice fluency strategies, social skills and overall behavioral management.


Teasing


• Instruct parents on ways to minimize activities that may reduce the child’s ability to focus or promote aggressive and impulsive behavior. For example, many television programs, video games and movies contain levels of violence that can significantly affect a child with ADHD who is already prone to aggressive behavior. In addition, there is some evidence that the amount of television children watch prior to age three is linked with attention problems in the school years. Thus, it is recommended that parents closely monitor their child’s television habits.


Most children who stutter are fluent when reading in unison with someone else. Rather than not calling on the child who stutters, let him have his turn with one of the other children. Let the whole class read in pairs sometimes so that the child who stutters doesn’t feel “special.” Gradually he may become more confident and be able to manage reading aloud on his own.


8 TIPS


ADHD & STUTTERING


Teasing can be very painful for the student who stutters, and it should be eliminated as far as possible.


• If the child has obviously been upset by teasing, talk with him or her one-on-one. Help the child to understand why others tease, and brainstorm ideas for how to respond.


• If any certain children are picking on him, talk to them alone and explain that teasing is unacceptable.


• Try to enlist their help. Most want the approval of the teacher.


• If the problem persists, you may want to consult a guidance counselor or social worker if one is available in your building. They often have good suggestions for managing teasing.


Speech Therapy


If you are unsure whether a speech pathologist is available in your school, talk with your building administrator. Also, suggest to the parents that they seek out one who specializes in stuttering. The Stuttering Foundation offers free referrals at StutteringHelp.org and tartamudez.org or call toll-free 800-992-9392.


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


The material in this brochure was originally compiled by Dean E. Williams, Ph.D., and updated by Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University.


1/19 1/19 © 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America ADHD-NEW.indd 1 Notes_to_teacher-NEW.indd 1 2/13/19 10:54 AM 12/7/18 12:59 PM No. 0124 No. 0114 No. 0042 No. 0113 8Tips-NEW.indd 1 No. 0118


School-Focused Stuttering Brochures 25 copies $3


50 copies $5 1/23/19 11:15 AM


A Nonprofit Organization Since 1947 — Helping Those Who Stutter P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749


info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia E. Charles Healey, Ph.D.,


University of Nebraska-Lincoln Stephen Soffer, Ph.D.,


Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia


FOR TEACHERS • Don’t tell the child to “slow down” or “just relax.”


Compiled by Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University


The Child Who Stutters at School: Joseph Donaher, M.A.,


• Don’t complete words for the student or talk for him or her.


• Help all members of the class learn to take turns talking and listening. All students — and especially those who stutter — find it much easier to talk when there are few interruptions, and they have the listener’s attention.


• Expect the same quality and quantity of work from the student who stutters as the one who doesn’t.


• Speak with the student in an unhurried way, pausing frequently.


• Convey that you are listening to the content of the message, not how it is said.


• Have a one-on-one conversation with the student who stutters about needed accommodations in the classroom. Respect the student’s needs, but do not be enabling.


• Don’t make stuttering something to be ashamed of. Talk about stuttering just like any other matter.


The Child Who Stutters at School:


NOTES TO THE TEACHER


8 Tips for Teachers WITH STUDENTS WHO STUTTER


Compiled by Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University 1. Don’t tell the student to “slow down” or “just relax.”


2. Don’t complete words for the child or talk for him or her.


3. Help all members of the class learn to take turns talking and listening. All students — and especially those who stutter — fi nd it much easier to talk when there are few interruptions, and they have the listener’s attention.


4. Expect the same quality and quantity of work from the student who stutters as the one who doesn’t.


5. Speak with the student in an unhurried way, pausing frequently.


6. Convey that you are listening to the content of the message, not how it is said.


7. Have a one-on-one conversation with the student who stutters about needed accommodations in the classroom. Respect the student’s needs, but do not be enabling.


8. Don’t make stuttering something to be ashamed of. Talk about stuttering just like any other matter.


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392


100 copies $8 Classroom Resource Set, 5 of Each No. 0038 $3 CLASSROOM PRESENTATION KIT


Cool tools for teachers, students, and SLPs! Contains full-color materials to use when making presentations about stuttering: 30 copies of 18 Famous People Who Stutter brochure, 30 copies of Did You Know: Fact Sheet About Stuttering, one 24” x 18” poster The King’s Speech, one 18” x 24” poster 18 Famous People Who Stutter, and one large poster of Darren Sproles for National Stuttering Awareness Week.


Presentation Kit No. 0130 $20


Emily Blunt, James Earl Jones, Marilyn Monroe, Winston Churchill, Sophie Gustafson, John Stossel, Joe Biden, Mel Tillis, Darren Sproles, Kenyon Martin, Carly Simon, Ed Sheeran, King George VI, Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson, Wayne Brady, Tim Gunn, Nicole Kidman, Kendrick Lamar, Elvis Presley, Bo Jackson, George Springer, Byron Pitts, Tiger Woods, Shaquille O’Neal, Marc Anthony, Michelle Williams, Peggy Lipton, Gordie Lane ...all famous and successful.


And all stuttered.


They share something else: like Emily Blunt, they didn’t let stuttering stop them. And if you’re one of the 70 million people who stutter worldwide, don’t let it stop you. If you stutter, you’re in good company!


Stuttering Awareness Week


In May 1988, the U.S. Congress passed a Joint Resolution designating the second week of May as National Stuttering Awareness Week. Stuttering Awareness Week is a special nationwide commitment to:


Emily Blunt, Actress • educate people about this complex disorder


• work toward the prevention of stuttering in children


• let people know that help is available


• promote research to find the causes of stuttering


The Stuttering Foundation has been working towards these goals–since 1947! Visit us at www.StutteringHelp.org or call toll-free 800-992-9392.


FamousPeople_brochure-NEW.indd 1


A Nonprofit Organization Since 1947 — Helping Those Who Stutter P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749


info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


1/19


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392


12/5/18 2:26 PM © 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America


U.S. Senator John Glenn and SFA President Jane Fraser at a press conference at the U.S. Congress designating


the first annual National Stuttering Awareness Week in 1988.


FAMOUS


PEOPLE WHO


STUTTER


celebrating National Stuttering Awareness Week


DID YOU KNOW... • Worldwide, more than 70 million people stutter. • Stuttering aff ects three to four times as many males as females.


• Approximately 5% of all children go through a period of stuttering that lasts six months or more. Three-quarters of those will recover by late childhood, leaving about 1% with a long-term problem.


• Exciting new research in the areas of genetics, neurophysiology, child development, and family dynamics is shedding light on the


possible causes of stuttering. As a result, we have made tremendous progress in the prevention of stuttering in young children.


• Studies show that people who stutter are as intelligent and well-adjusted as those who don’t.


• People who stutter are often self-conscious about it and may let it determine the vocation they choose.


• There are no instant miracle cures for stuttering.


• Stuttering becomes an increasingly formidable problem in the teen years.


• A qualifi ed clinician can help not only children but also teenagers, young adults, and even older adults make signifi cant progress toward fl uency.


• James Earl Jones, John Stossel, Emily Blunt, Darren Sproles, King George VI, Annie Glenn,


Bill Walton, Mel Tillis, Alan Rabinowitz, Carly Simon, Ken Venturi, Bob Love, Ed Sheeran, Joe Biden,


Winston Churchill, Marilyn Monroe, Kenyon Martin, Sophie Gustafson, and Byron Pitts — all famous people who stutter.


did-you-know-NEW.indd 1


2/5/19 1:31 PM


Put it in Writing These quality pencils are perfect to hand out. 17 Pencil Item No. 0236 5 for $1


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