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STUTTERING FOUNDATION BROCHURE & FLYER SET


dditional Resources ent of Education: https://sites.ed.gov/idea/


www.understood.org/en/school-learning/ s/rti/understanding-response-to-intervention


Special


ORDER ONLINE w.StutteringHelp.org


es I Just Stutter glish Edition #0031 anish Edition #0032


m Presentation Packet #0130


g: Straight Talk for Teachers resource booklet #0126


ool-Age Child Who Stutters: Working ly With Attitudes and Emotions k #0005


the School-Age Child Who Stutters: for Clinicians Book #0014


in Action: The School-Age Child tters DVD #1079


g: For Kids, by Kids: All Grown Up 345


Education Law and Children Who Stutter


And all stuttered.


A Nonprofit Organization Since 1947 — Helping Those Who Stutter


Emily Blunt, James Earl Jones, Marilyn Monroe, Winston Churchill, Sophie Gustafson, John Stossel, Joe Biden, Mel Tillis, Darren Sproles, Kenyon Martin, Carly Simon, Ed Sheeran, King George VI, Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson, Wayne Brady, Tim Gunn, Nicole Kidman, Kendrick Lamar, Elvis Presley, Bo Jackson, George Springer, Byron Pitts, Tiger Woods, Shaquille O’Neal, Marc Anthony, Michelle Williams, Peggy Lipton, Gordie Lane ...all famous and successful.


They share something else: like Emily Blunt, they didn’t let stuttering stop them. And if you’re one of the 70 million people who stutter worldwide, don’t let it stop you. If you stutter, you’re in good company!


Stuttering Awareness Week MYTHS MYTH: Stuttering is linked to intelligence.


Guidelines for Treating Children with ADHD


ABOUT STUTTERING


One of the most frustrating aspects about stuttering is that it is a variable disorder. In other words, sometimes you may stutter quite a bit and other times you may not. Because it is so variable and complex, stuttering is often misunderstood. Here we discuss and debunk some common myths about stuttering.


• Structure activities according to a consistent, organized schedule that the child has helped to create. Post these routines in the therapy room so that the child is aware of the schedule and what is expected of him or her. It is helpful to schedule in play breaks so the child knows that something fun is ahead.


REALITY: There is no link whatsoever between stuttering and intelligence.


FAMOUS


PEOPLE WHO


STUTTER


MYTH: Nervousness causes stuttering. REALITY: Nervousness does not cause stuttering. Nor should we assume that people who stutter are prone to be nervous, fearful, anxious, or shy. They have the same full range of personality traits as those who do not stutter.


MYTH: Stuttering can be “caught” through imitation or by hearing another person stutter.


U.S. Senator John Glenn and SFA President Jane Fraser at a press conference at the U.S. Congress designating


REALITY: You can’t “catch” stuttering. No one knows the exact causes of stuttering, but recent research indicates that family history (genetics), neuromuscular development, and the child’s environment,


the fi rst annual National Stuttering Awareness Week in 1988.


In May 1988, the U.S. Congress passed a Joint Resolution designating the second week of May as National Stuttering Awareness Week. Stuttering Awareness Week is a special nationwide commitment to:


• educate people about this complex disorder


• work toward the prevention of stuttering in children


• let people know that help is available


ringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 help.org ˙ tartamudez.org


• promote research to fi nd the causes of stuttering


The Stuttering Foundation has been working towards these goals–since 1947! Visit us at www.StutteringHelp.org or call toll-free 800-992-9392.


FamousPeople_brochure-NEW.indd 1 #0113 MYTHS SIX TIPS


FOR SPEAKING WITH OMEONE WHO STUTTERS


STUTTERING utter are not smart.


g may look like a problem that can be easily solved with vice, but for many adults, it can be a chronic life-long . Here are some ways that you, the listener, can help.


ink whatsoever between stuttering auses stuttering.


t make remarks like: “Slow down,” “Take a h,” or “Relax.” Such simplistic advice can be demeaning and is not helpful.


s does not cause stuttering. Nor at people who stutter are prone to anxious, or shy. They have the same lity traits as those who do not stutter.


be “caught” through imitation or by on stutter.


atch” stuttering. No one knows the ering, but recent research indicates genetics), neuro-muscular


the person know by your manner that you are ning to what he or she says — not how they


e child’s environment, including play a role in the onset of stuttering.


a person to “take a deep breath before out what you want to say first.”


u may be tempted to finish sentences or fill in ds. Try not to do so.


only makes a person more self- he stuttering worse. More helpful tening patiently and modeling slow urself.


aware that those who stutter usually have e trouble controlling their speech on the ne. Please be patient in this situation. If you the phone and hear nothing, be sure it is not


tuttering.


ed above, many complex factors s not the cause, but it certainly can


n who stutters trying to start the conversation you hang up.


ping Those Who Stutter Memphis, TN 38111-0749


elp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 org ˙ tartamudez.org


ak in an unhurried way — but not so slowly o sound unnatural. This promotes good nication with everyone.


nization


A Nonprofit Organization Since 1947 — Helping Those Who Stutter P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749


info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


ntain natural eye contact and wait patiently naturally until the person is finished.


BULLYING & SLPs


Enhancing our Roles as Advocates for Students who Stutter


Myth: Nervousness causes stuttering.


Reality: Nervousness does not cause stuttering. Nor should we assume that people who stutter are prone to be nervous, fearful, anxious, or shy. They have the same full range of personality traits as those who do not stutter.


by Gordon Blood, Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University


Myth: Stuttering can be “caught” through imitation or by hearing another person stutter.


Reality: You can’t “catch” stuttering. No one knows the exact causes of stuttering, but recent research indicates that family history (genetics), neuromuscular development, and the child’s environment, including family dynamics, all play


a role in the onset of stuttering.


Myth: It helps to tell a person to “take a deep breath before talking,” or “think about what you want to say first.”


Reality: This advice only makes a person more self-conscious, making the stuttering worse. More helpful responses include listening patiently and modeling slow and clear speech yourself.


Myth: Stress causes stuttering.


Reality: As mentioned above, many complex factors are involved. Stress is not the cause, but it certainly can aggravate stuttering.


MYTHS ABOUT STUTTERING


Myth: People who stutter are not smart. Reality: There is no link whatsoever between stuttering and intelligence.


7/19/18 1:27 PM Myths-NEW.indd 1 including family dynamics, all play a role in the onset of stuttering.


MYTH: It helps to tell a person to “take a deep breath before talking,” or “think about what you want to say first.”


• Make therapy personal by focusing on the child’s interests. For example, if a child is interested in sports, build the session around a game of football. You can use the rules of the game as content for discussion and create a reward system based on the number of yards a team advances or on touchdowns scored.


• Keep instructions simple, clear and concise. Present directions multiple times and have the child repeat them back before responding. This will lead to long-term retention of the material and increased learning.


REALITY: This advice only makes a person more self-conscious, making the stuttering worse. More helpful responses include listening patiently and modeling slow and clear speech yourself.


MYTH: Stress causes stuttering.


REALITY: As mentioned above, many complex factors are involved. Stress is not the cause, but it certainly can aggravate stuttering.


• Use frequent praise and establish a reward system that changes over time to keep the child motivated and interested. Children with ADHD often crave attention and excel in positive environments where they are surrounded by support.


A Nonprofit Organization Since 1947 — Helping Those Who Stutter P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392


© 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America


info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


• Increase the child’s self-monitoring skills and awareness of how behaviors affect interactions with others. Focus on the child’s ability to accurately assess his speech in a variety of speaking situations ranging from simple to complex. Then teach problem solving skills to allow him to change these behaviors accordingly.


1/19


• Provide visual cues, concrete examples and/or drawings to assist in comprehension. For example, by using the analogy of the garden hose, you may be better able to show how speech flow can be disrupted at various locations along the “hose,” such as the lips, the larynx, etc. With concrete examples, the child is better able to understand and retain the information.


celebrating National Stuttering Awareness Week


• Address overall communication skills. By introducing and modeling appropriate skills such as eye contact, volume, rate, listening skills yourself, you will help to increase the child’s confidence and self-esteem while reducing speech-related anxiety.


• To foster generalization of new skills, explore grouping the child with other children who have similar characteristics. The desensitization gained by such a meeting frequently reduces anxiety and promotes more fluent speech. It is also an optimal setting to practice fluency strategies, social skills and overall behavioral management.


• Instruct parents on ways to minimize activities that may reduce the child’s ability to focus or promote aggressive and impulsive behavior. For example, many television programs, video games and movies contain levels of violence that can significantly affect a child with ADHD who is already prone to aggressive behavior. In addition, there is some evidence that the amount of television children watch prior to age three is linked with attention problems in the school years. Thus, it is recommended that parents closely monitor their child’s television habits.


Tips for Parents (continued) When he is speaking, try to focus on the following:


1. Listen to what your child has to say. Use facial expressions and other body language to convey that you are listening to the content of the message and not to how your child is talking. Maintain eye contact.


2. Allow your child the time he needs to finish his thoughts.


3. Help all members of the family learn to take turns talking and listening. Objects such a microphone or a salt shaker at the dinner table can be passed to indicate each person’s turn. This provides a good model for the child with an ASD and helps her to feel like your family is “in this together.”


4. Choose specific and brief times to work on strategies in the midst of everyday activities, such as 5-10 minutes during bath time. Short consistent practice is often most effective.


Tips for Therapists in Structuring Sessions


Emily Blunt, Actress


Structure activities according to a consistent, organized schedule that the young person has helped to create. Post these routines in the therapy room so he is aware of the schedule and what comes next. The ASD population benefits most from direct engagement; this is contrary to the ADHD population who respond to rewards. Therefore, you should teach and practice tools in the context of play or preferred activities to keep the young person engaged, and to make activities meaningful. If activities are meaningful, she will remember and use them outside therapy. Research indicates if children with ASDs are not first engaged, all the rewards in the world will lead to generalization. Therefore, engagement is key.


For example, if the child is engaged and motivated to have a snack, have her practice speech tools when asking for the snack.


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


1. Keep instructions simple, clear, and concise. Be sure that the child is engaged with you, and present directions multiple times if necessary. If there is no response, try simplifying the directions and/or adding visual/contextual cues. For example, simplify “Get your coat so we can go outside” to “Going outside. Get coat” while pointing to the child’s coat.


1/19


ADHD & STUTTERING


Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia E. Charles Healey, Ph.D.,


5. Address overall communication skills. By introducing and modeling appropriate skills such as eye contact, volume, rate, and listening skills yourself, you will help to increase the child’s confidence and self-esteem while reducing speech- related anxiety.


University of Nebraska-Lincoln Stephen Soffer, Ph.D.,


Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia


6. Young people with ASDs benefit from working with socially stronger peers who can act as role models. To foster generalization of new skills, explore grouping the individual with others who have similar speech characteristics and who are good social models. This will provide an optimal setting to practice fluency tools, social skills, and overall self- monitoring.


2. Provide visual cues, concrete examples and drawings to increase comprehension. For example, try stretching slime or clay while practicing easing in to a speech sound “e e e a s y.”


3. Increase the child’s self-monitoring skills and awareness of how behaviors affect interactions with others. Focus on the accuracy of self-assessment of his speech in simple and complex speaking situations. Then teach problem solving to allow him to change his speech accordingly.


The Child Who Stutters at School: Joseph Donaher, M.A.,


4. Keep in mind the child’s level of functioning: some are quite literal and need more concrete examples, such as rating their use of speech tools “thumbs up” or “thumbs down,” while others can use more cognitivelybased rating systems, such as using a scale from 1-5.


AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS


& STUTTERING SIX TIPS


FOR SPEAKING WITH SOMEONE WHO STUTTERS


Stuttering may look like a problem that can be easily solved with simple advice, but for many adults, it can be a chronic life-long disordter. Here are some ways that you, the listener, can help.


1. Don’t make remarks like: “Slow down,” “Take a breath,” or “Relax.” Such simplistic advice can be felt as demeaning and is not helpful.


2. Let the person know by your manner that you are listening to what he or she says — not how they say it.


3. Maintain natural eye contact and wait patiently and naturally until the person is fi nished.


4. You may be tempted to fi nish sentences or fi ll in words. Try not to do so.


5. Be aware that those who stutter usually have more trouble controlling their speech on the telephone. Please be patient in this situation. If you pick up the phone and hear nothing, be sure it is not a person who stutters trying to start the conversation before you hang up.


6. Speak in an unhurried way — but not so slowly as to sound unnatural. This pro-motes good communication with everyone.


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ info@StutteringHelp.org 800-992-9392 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


1/19


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392


© 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America ADHD-NEW.indd 1 #0115* 2/12/19 3:45 PM Autism-NEW.indd 1 #0044 I must speak without stuttering.


ANSWERS FOR EMPLOYERS


Some people who stutter might feel that it is their obligation to their parents, family, friends or even strangers to speak without stuttering. The root of this belief is that we (people who stutter) are broken and believe we are a burden to others. And the reality is that this belief is flawed. As people who stutter, we have a voice, and our voice deserves to be heard. While we may have a social obligation to communicate as effectively as we can, our listeners also have a social obligation to honor our right to freedom of speech.


I shouldn’t talk about stuttering. DID YOU KNOW... MYTHS ABOUT STUTTERING


One of the most frustrating aspects about stuttering is that it is a variable disorder. In other words, sometimes you may stutter quite a bit and other times you may not. Because it is so variable and complex, stuttering is often misunderstood. Here we dis- cuss and debunk some common myths about stuttering.


• Worldwide, more than 70 million people stutter.


• Stuttering affects three to four times as many males as females. MYTH: Stuttering is linked to intelligence.


• Approximately 5% of all children go through a period of stuttering that lasts six months or more. Three-quarters of those will recover by late childhood, leaving about 1% with a long-term problem.


Feeling shame about stuttering is normal. But talking about stuttering with the right people makes things better, not worse. You may be surprised by how many people will want to listen and will want to help. Start by talking with someone you trust such as a parent, sibling, teacher at school, or friend. You can meet other people who stutter by contacting local support groups or participating in an online support forum. You can also ask your speech pathologist to schedule some group therapy sessions so you can work with others who stutter.


Stuttering will hold me back in life.


People who stutter are as smart and capable as anyone else. History is filled with exceptionally smart, talented and successful people who stutter, including: King George VI; Prime Minister Winston Churchill; physicist Albert Einstein; scientist Charles Darwin; actress Marilyn Monroe; legendary Chicago Bulls star Bob Love; famous zoologist and animal rights activist Alan Rabinowitz; Vice President Joseph Biden; actresses Nicole Kidman and Emily Blunt; professional golfer Tiger Woods; actor and the voice of “Darth Vader,” James Earl Jones; actor Bruce Willis; TV host Mike Rowe; pop singer Marc Anthony; businessman Jack Welch; national news correspondent Byron Pitts; NFL running back Darren Sproles; world-renowned TV correspondent John Stossel; Oscar and Grammy winner Carly Simon; musician Kendrick Lamar; NBA star Kenyon Martin; golf pro Sophie Gustafson; Congressman Frank Wolf; NBA Hall of Famer and NBC Sports commentator Bill Walton; country music artist Mel Tillis; acclaimed actor Eric Roberts; major league baseball player Johnny Damon; American Idol contestant Lazaro Arbos; and many more.


© 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America loyeersNEW.indd 1 #0124 TIPS FOR TALKING


WITH YOUR CHILD agree that most children who stutter benefit from taking speak at a rate that promotes fluency. These guidelines represent a number of ways that adults can help.


8 Tips for Teachers WITH STUDENTS WHO STUTTER


uce the pace. Speak with your child in an unhurried using frequently. Wait a few seconds after your child before you begin to speak. Your own easy relaxed


will be far more effective than any advice such as “slow r “try it again slowly.” For some children, it is also helpful uce a more relaxed pace of life for awhile.


2. Don’t complete words for the child or talk for him or her.


1. Don’t tell the student to “slow down” or “just relax.” Risk Factor Teasing


Elevated Risk


Family history of stuttering


Age at onset


3. Help all members of the class learn to take turns talking and listening. All students — and especially those who stutter — fi nd it much easier to talk when there are few interruptions, and they have the listener’s attention.


member who still stutters Time since onset


listening. Try to increase those times that you give d your undivided attention and are really listening. This mean dropping everything every time she speaks.


ng questions. Asking questions is a normal part of


t try to resist asking one after the other. Sometimes it is lpful to comment on what your child has said and wait.


Gender


4. Expect the same quality and quantity of work from the student who stutters as the one who doesn’t.


5. Speak with the student in an unhurried way, pausing frequently.


Other speech production concerns


Language skills


6. Convey that you are listening to the content of the message, not how it is said.


Advanced, delayed, or disordered


taking. Help all members of the family take turns nd listening. Children find it much easier to talk when e fewer interruptions.


ding confidence. Use descriptive praise to build ce. An example would be “I like the way you picked up s. You’re so helpful,” instead of “That’s great.” Praise s unrelated to talking as well, such as athletic skills, ganized, independent, or careful.


cial times. Set aside a few minutes at a regular time y when you can give your undivided attention to your is quiet, calm time — no TV, iPad or phones — can be a ce builder for young children. As little as five minutes a make a difference.


7. Have a one-on-one conversation with the student who stutters about needed accommodations in the classroom. Respect the student’s needs, but do not be enabling.


8. Don’t make stuttering something to be ashamed of. Talk about stuttering just like any other matter.


Speech Therapy


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392


mal rules apply. Discipline the child who stutters just o your other children and just as you would if he didn’t


© 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America © 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America 09-18 .indd 1 8Tips-NEW.indd 1 Notes_to_teacher-NEW.indd 1 #0118* 7 TIPS


ING WITH YOUR CHILD 8 CONSEJOS


PARA LOS MAESTROS


. Speak with your child in an unhurried ently. Wait a few seconds after your


o le pida al niño que “hable más lento” o “que aje”.


re you begin to speak. Your own easy be far more effective than any advice n” or “try it again slowly.” For some helpful to introduce a more relaxed ile.


ry to increase those times that you give ivided attention and are really listening. n dropping everything every time she


complete las palabras ni tampoco hable por o o la niña.


yude a todos los alumnos de la clase a tar la toma de turnos al hablar y escuchar. A los niños – y especialmente a aquellos que mudean- les resulta más fácil hablar cuando en pocas interrupciones y cuando el oyente esta atención.


ns. Asking questions is a normal part to resist asking one after the other. ore helpful to comment on what your ait.


pere la misma calidad de trabajo de los niños artamudean como de aquellos que no lo hacen.


elp all members of the family take turns g. Children find it much easier to talk er interruptions.


dence. Use descriptive praise to build xample would be “I like the way you s. You’re so helpful,” instead of “That’s ngths unrelated to talking as well, such ing organized, independent, or careful.


et aside a few minutes at a regular time


u can give your undivided attention to et, calm time — no TV, iPad or phones nce builder for young children. As little y can make a difference.


o haga de la tartamudez algo por lo que estar onzado. Hable sobre la tartamudez como lo sobre cualquier otra dificultad.


pply. Discipline the child who stutters other children and just as you would if


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


El material en este folleto fue compilado originalmente por Dean E. Williams, Ph.D., y actualizado por Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., de la Florida State University. Traducción por Martha Tarasco, M.D.


© 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America


ble con el alumno de un modo poco acelerado, ando pausas.


anifieste estar escuchando el contenido del aje, y no como lo dice.


nga una conversación cara a cara con el que tartamudea sobre las necesidades de ación dentro del aula. Respete las necesidades umno pero no sea demasiado permisivo.


1/23/19 11:15 AM Telephone-NEW.indd 1 #0041


STUTTERING & the Bilingual Child


Factores de Riesgo


Historia familiar de tartamudez


Edad de Inicio


Mayor probabilidad de que empiece a tartamudear


Un pariente, hermano, u otro miembro de la familia que todavía tartamudea


Después de los 3 1/2 años Tiempo desde el inicio Sexo


Tartamudeo de 6 a 12 meses o más.


Masculino


GRAFICA DE FACTORES DE RIESGO


Señale los factores de coincidencia con respecto a su hijo. Burlas y bromas


Cierto para mi hijo


tartamudea, dele una oportunidad con el apoyo de algún otro niño. Permita que todos los niños puedan leer en pares, para que el niño que tartamudea no se sienta especial, gradualmente se tendrá más confianza y podrá llegar a leer por sí mismo.


8 CONSEJOS


SI USTED CREE


Las burlas pueden ser muy dolorosas para el niño que tartamudea, y deben ser eliminadas tanto como sea factible. Si el niño se ha alterado por las burlas, hable con él. Hágale ver que muchos niños reciben burlas por diversos motivos; Dígale al niño que no se lo tome demasiado en serio. Si en particular hay algún grupo de niños que lo molestan habitualmente, hábleles a solas, y explíqueles que tartamudear es un problema para ese niño y que con las burlas se puede poner peor. Trate de alentar su ayuda; la mayoría querrá la aprobación de su maestro. Castigarlos por sus burlas NO ayuda.


Otros problemas de retraso en habla y lenguaje


Terapia de lenguaje Errores de sonido,


problema en ser entendido, o dificultad en seguir instrucciones


Nuestros videos están disponibles en StutteringHelp.org/Streaming. Más información y recursos disponibles en Tartamudez.org.


Si no localiza a ningún médico Foniatra, sugiera a los papás que le busquen a alguno, preferentemente especializado en tartamudez y que tenga un certificado de competencia- clínica, del American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. La Fundación Americana para tartamudez puede aconsejarle gratuitamente. Llame al 800-992- 9392 ó pongase en contacto con su médico para que lo refiera al especialista.


Le hemos explicado algunos puntos generales en este folleto. Pero no olvide que cada niño es diferente y su actitud positiva y de cuidado harán una gran diferencia.


RECIBIENDO LLAMADAS PARA LOS MAESTROS


Compilado por Lisa Scott, Ph.D., Florida State University Traducción y adaptación: Mara Luque, fonoaudióloga, Argentina


QUE SU NIÑO TARTAMUDEA


Esta es el área donde tienes menos control, sin embargo puedes “salir al encuentro” de esa “tensión” que sientes cada vez que suene el teléfono.


1. No le pida al niño que “hable más lento” o “que se relaje”. 2. No complete las palabras ni tampoco hable por el niño o la niña.


3. Ayude a todos los alumnos de la clase a respetar la toma de turnos al hablar y escuchar. A todos los niños – y especialmente a aquellos que tartamudean- les resulta más fácil hablar cuando existen pocas interrupciones y cuando el oyente les presta atención.


4. Espere la misma calidad de trabajo de los niños que tartamudean como de aquellos que no lo hacen.


Contesta siempre la llamada a tu ritmo. No corras a coger el teléfono. De nuevo prepara palabras iniciales: el nombre de tu organización, tu n° de teléfono o tu nombre. Utiliza lo que te resulte más cómodo para ese momento.


Concéntrate en la llamada que recibas. Acepta el hecho de que las personas que te rodean pueden oir y ver tu bloqueo pero no permitas que su presencia te distraiga de tu llamada.


5. Hable con el alumno de un modo poco acelerado, realizando pausas.


6. Manifieste estar escuchando el contenido del mensaje, y no como lo dice.


No tengas miedo a un silencio inicial si te cuesta emitir la primera palabra. Es bastante normal que alguien conteste el teléfono y luego no hable, bien porque está acabando una conversación con un compañero o porque ha cogido el teléfono de otra persona.


7. Tenga una conversación cara a cara con el niño que tartamudea sobre las necesidades de adaptación dentro del aula. Respete las necesidades del alumno pero no sea demasiado permisivo.


8. No haga de la tartamudez algo por lo que estar avergonzado. Hable sobre la tartamudez como lo hace sobre cualquier otra dificultad.


Advertencia General


∙ La práctica debe ayudarte a encontrarte más animado y contento, con la utilización del teléfono.


∙ Enfréntate al temor del teléfono. Habla sobre lo que tienes miedo de que ocurra y qué puedes hacer para mejorarlo.


El material de este folleto fue compilado por Dr. Barry Guitar, University of Vermont, y el Dr. Edward G. Conture, Vanderbilt University,y traducción por Martha Tarasco, M.D.


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


∙ Se consciente de las situaciones que provocan en ti el que “evites” utilizar el teléfono. Intenta hacer todas las llamadas locales que puedas. Elige el llamar a una persona antes de escribirle una carta o presentate en su casa.


1/19 12/13/18 9:29 AM #0042 What to do?


∙ Intenta ser la persona que conteste e teléfono en casa. Admite de forma abierta qe tartamudeas. Esto puede resultar muy dificil si durante toda tu vida has intentado esconder o evitar hablar de este problema. Muchas personas han dicho que el hablar de ello les ha reducido sus ansiedades y temores.


El Niño Que Tartamudea EN LA ESCUELA


∙ Observa y escucha a personas no tartamudear, utilizando el teléfono. Escucha su falta de fluidez y sus interjecciones.


∙ Da a los demás el beneficio de la duda. Si saben que tartamudeas luego ellos estarán preparados y entenderán posibles silencios.


∙ Finalmente: Practica, practica y practica…no dejes que un trozo de plástico, de tu vida moderna domine y condicione tu vida. Es mucho mejor que, aunque tartamudees, utilices el teléfono a que lo evites.


While there may not be a direct link between Tourette’s Syndrome and stuttering, the two problems often occur together.


When you think your child has TS


Often the first symptoms of TS are facial tics, such as rapid eye blinks or twitching movements around the mouth. Frequent throat clearing or sniffing sounds also often appear early. If you think your child has such symptoms, you should make an appointment with your family physician or a neurologist for a thorough assessment. Keep in mind that there are no laboratory tests that can determine if someone has TS, hence the opinion of a clinician experienced in managing patients with TS is the only way to confirm the diagnosis. If necessary, TS can be treated effectively with medication, behavioral management and proper counseling.


When you think your child is stuttering


STUTTERING and Tourette’s Syndrome


Utilizando


EL TELÉFONO Consejo Para Las Personas Que Tartamudean


Many children with TS have frequent disfluencies in their speech. Sometimes their vocal tics may resemble speech behaviors often seen in stuttering. If you have questions about whether or not your child stutters, you should make an appointment with a speechlanguage pathologist who has experience in working with children who stutter. The speech-language pathologist will talk to you as a parent or caregiver to obtain the necessary background information and will conduct a thorough evaluation of your child’s speech to determine whether developmental stuttering is present.


Las contribuciones son deducibles de impuestos y nos ayudan a continuar con nuestro trabajo.


The Stuttering Foundation is a tax-exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the


Internal Revenue Code. Charitable contributions are tax deductible, and help us continue our work.


12/7/18 12:59 PM WhyST-NEW.indd 1 #0045 1/24/19 12:46 PM #0065 #0043 2/21/19 11:08 AM


A Nonprofit Organization Since 1947 — Helping Those Who Stutter P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749


info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


The material in this brochure was originally compiled by Dean E. Williams, Ph.D., and updated by Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University.


If you are unsure whether a speech pathologist is available in your school, talk with your building administrator. Also, suggest to the parents that they seek out one who specializes in stuttering. The Stuttering Foundation offers free referrals at StutteringHelp.org and tartamudez.org or call toll-free 800-992-9392.


• Try to enlist their help. Most want the approval of the teacher.


Speech sound errors or trouble being understood


Our videos are available at StutteringHelp.org/Streaming. More information and resources available on StutteringHelp.org.


• If the problem persists, you may want to consult a guidance counselor or social worker if one is available in your building. They often have good suggestions for managing teasing.


• If the child has obviously been upset by teasing, talk with him or her one-on-one. Help the child to understand why others tease, and brainstorm ideas for how to respond. Male


After age 31/2


Stuttering 6–12 months or longer


• If any certain children are picking on him, talk to them alone and explain that teasing is unacceptable.


Teasing can be very painful for the student who stutters, and it should be eliminated as far as possible.


A parent, sibling, or other family


RISK FACTOR CHART Compiled by Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University


Some factors may indicate that your child is more at risk for stuttering. Knowing these factors will help you decide whether or not your child needs to see a speech-language pathologist. Place a check next to each that is true for the child.


True for Child


Most children who stutter are fluent when reading in unison with someone else. Rather than not calling on the child who stutters, let him have his turn with one of the other children. Let the whole class read in pairs sometimes so that the child who stutters doesn’t feel “special.” Gradually he may become more confident and be able to manage reading aloud on his own.


1/24/19 12:06 PM MythsBeliefs-NEW.indd 1 #0068 8 TIPS


IF YOU


THINK YOUR CHILD STUTTERS


FOR TEACHERS • Don’t tell the child to “slow down” or “just relax.”


Compiled by Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University


• Exciting new research in the areas of genetics, neurophysiology, child development, and family dynamics is shedding light on the


• Studies show that people who stutter are as intelligent and well-adjusted as those who don’t.


REALITY: There is no link whatsoever between stuttering and intelligence.


possible causes of stuttering. As a result, we have made tremendous progress in the prevention of stuttering in young children.


MYTH: Nervousness causes stuttering. REALITY: Nervousness does not cause stuttering. Nor should we assume that people who stutter are prone to be nervous, fearful, anxious, or shy. They have the same full range of personality traits as those who do not stutter.


MYTH: Stuttering can be “caught” through imitation or by hearing another person stutter.


• People who stutter are often self-conscious about it and may let it determine the vocation they choose.


• There are no instant miracle cures for stuttering.


REALITY: You can’t “catch” stuttering. No one knows the exact causes of stuttering, but recent research indicates that family history (genetics), neuromuscular development, and the child’s environment, including family dynamics, all play a role in the onset of stuttering.


MYTH: It helps to tell a person to “take a deep breath before talking,” or “think about what you want to say first.”


• Stuttering becomes an increasingly formidable problem in the teen years.


REALITY: This advice only makes a person more self-conscious, making the stuttering worse. More helpful responses include listening patiently and modeling slow and clear speech yourself.


• A qualified clinician can help not only children but also teenagers, young adults, and even older adults make significant progress toward fluency.


MYTH: Stress causes stuttering. • James Earl Jones, John Stossel,


REALITY: As mentioned above, many complex factors are involved. Stress is not the cause, but it certainly can aggravate stuttering.


Emily Blunt, Darren Sproles, King George VI, Kendrick Lamar, George Springer, Ed Sheeran, Joe Biden, Winston Churchill, Marilyn Monroe, Tiger Woods, Nicole Kidman, and Marc Anthony — all famous people who stutter.


12/5/18 2:26 PM #0114


MYTHS. BELIEFS.


• Palilalia—speech disorder in which a word, phrase, or sentence may be repeated several times, generally with increasing rapidity and decreasing distinctness


• Anomia—difficulty in finding the appropriate word to use


• Confusion—uncertainty as to their own identity and that of others, their location, current time period, etc.


STRAIGHT TALK.


How is neurogenic stuttering diagnosed? 2/13/19 10:54 AM #0116


7 Tips for Talking WITH YOUR CHILD


Before getting treatment, it is important that someone suspected of neurogenic stuttering be diagnosed accurately. It is advisable to consult with a speech-language pathologist who specializes in stuttering to make the diagnosis. The SLP will want to seek input from the physicians involved in the clients’ care. The evaluation will include consideration of the fluency problem and the individuals’ case history, current medical status, and the presence of other communication impairments. The diagnosis should determine whether the disfluency is neurogenic in origin and whether any other communication impairments are affecting fluency.


Experts agree that most children who stutter benefi t from taking time to speak at a rate that promotes fl uency. These guidelines represent a number of ways that adults can help.


1. Reduce the pace. Speak with your child in an unhurried way, pausing frequently. Wait a few seconds after your child finishes before you begin to speak. Your own easy relaxed speech will be far more eff ective than any advice such as “slow down” or “try it again slowly.” For some children, it is also helpful to introduce a more relaxed pace of life for awhile.


2/21/19 7:38 AM 6_tips_flyerNEW.indd 1 #0046*


of different or additional techniques and approaches may be indicated based on the presence of other communication and cognitive disorders and the nature of the individual’s underlying neurological condition. If other communication disorders are also present, additional therapy directed at alleviating their effects may enhance fluency as well. Physicians, nurses, occupational, physical, and respiratory therapists may also be able to provide assistance in dealing with medical conditions and symptoms which have an impact on speech fluency.


2. Full listening. Try to increase those times that you give your child your undivided attention and are really listening. This does not mean dropping everything every time she speaks.


3. Asking questions. Asking questions is a normal part of life – but try to resist asking one after the other. Sometimes it is more helpful to comment on what your child has said and wait.


How is neurogenic stuttering treated? Because many conditions can cause neurogenic stuttering and affect the frequency with which it co-exists with other communication impairments, there is no single treatment approach that is effective in alleviating its symptoms. Treatment is often carried out by a speech-language pathologist working in conjunction with the clients’ physicians. Some therapy techniques that help reduce the symptoms of developmental stuttering may also be effective with neurogenic stuttering. These include:


• Slowing speech rate (saying fewer words on each breath by increasing the duration of the sounds and words).


Having an understanding of the disorder can help families and caregivers structure communication situations to best help the client. This can have a significant impact on reducing their concerns and improving communication. Strategies may include simplifying one’s speech, allowing more time for response, modeling slow, easy speaking patterns, and, in general, reducing communication demands and expectations. It is important to recognize that the recovery process from the underlying neurological injury or disease will often have a significant impact on fluency. Also keep in mind that because recovery from neurological injury or disease may be slow, patience will be needed.


4. Turn taking. Help all members of the family take turns talking and listening. Children find it much easier to talk when there are fewer interruptions.


5. Building confi dence. Use descriptive praise to build confi dence. An example would be “I like the way you picked up your toys. You’re so helpful,” instead of “That’s great.” Praise strengths unrelated to talking as well, such as athletic skills, being organized, independent, or careful.


6. Special times. Set aside a few minutes at a regular time each day when you can give your undivided attention to your child. This quiet, calm time — no TV, iPad or phones — can be a confi dence builder for young children. As little as fi ve minutes a day can make a diff erence.


• Emphasizing a gentle onset of the start of each phrase (starting from a relaxed posture of the speech muscles, beginning with adequate respiratory support, a slow and easy initiation of the exhalation and gentle onset of the first sound).


• Emphasizing a smooth flow of speech production and use of relaxed posture, both in terms of general body posture and for specific speech production muscles.


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ info@StutteringHelp.org 800-992-9392 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


© 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America 1/19


• Identifying the disruptions in the speech patterns and instructing the client in the use of more appropriate patterns.


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392


In addition, if the person is expressing anxiety or concern about his fluency, therapy may include education about the disorder and counseling to change attitudes and perceptions. The use


12/4/18 1:03 PM did-you-know-NEW.indd 1 #0047* RECEIVING CALLS


This is the area over which you have least control. However, even here you can go part way to easing some of the pressure you may feel.


Always answer the call in your own time. Don’t rush to the telephone.


• Don’t complete words for the student or talk for him or her.


• Help all members of the class learn to take turns talking and listening. All students — and especially those who stutter — find it much easier to talk when there are few interruptions, and they have the listener’s attention.


• Expect the same quality and quantity of work from the student who stutters as the one who doesn’t.


Again have key word options ready: your extension number, name of your organization, or even just your name. Use whatever comes easiest to you at that moment.


If you receive a call within earshot of other people, concentrate solely on that call. Accept that others may hear and see you block, but do not allow their presence to distract you from your phone call.


• Speak with the student in an unhurried way, pausing frequently.


• Convey that you are listening to the content of the message, not how it is said.


Don’t be afraid of initial silence on the phone if you struggle for your first word. It is quite common for someone to answer the phone and then not speak, either because they’re finishing a conversation with a colleague or because they have picked up someone else’s phone and are waiting for them to return to their seat.


• Have a one-on-one conversation with the student who stutters about needed accommodations in the classroom. Respect the student’s needs, but do not be enabling.


• Don’t make stuttering something to be ashamed of. Talk about stuttering just like any other matter. General Advice


∙ Practice should help you to feel happier about using the telephone.


A Nonprofit Organization Since 1947 — Helping Those Who Stutter P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749


info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


Compiled by Dr. Barry Guitar, University of Vermont, and Dr. Edward G. Conture, Vanderbilt University


∙ Confront your fear of the telephone. Talk about what it is that you fear happening and what you can do about it.


∙ Try to be aware of situations where you avoid using the telephone and gradually tackle these calls. Make the most of local calls for practice. Choose to use the telephone rather than write letters.


1/19


The person phoning you may also stutter. Be patient with others who may be just as anxious as you and may be putting into practice some of the above points.


2/12/19 2:22 PM Neurogenic-NEW.indd 1 #0119


∙ Try to be the person in your household who answers the telephone.


The Child Who Stutters at School:


NOTES TO THE TEACHER


∙ Openly admit that you stutter. This may be very difficult if you have avoided talking about it all your life. Practice talking about your stuttering. Many people have said that talking about it has reduced their anxiety and fear.


∙ Watch and listen to non-stutterers using the telephone. Listen to their lack of fluency and their hesitation.


∙ Give others the benefit of the doubt. If they know you stutter then they are prepared to expect some silences.


to exaggerate stressed syllables in longer words while being sure to include all the un-stressed syllables (e.g., “par·tic´·u·lar,” “con·di´·tion·al,” or “gen·er·o´·si·ty”). Some clutterers benefit from planning both the content (the “what”) of a message as well as the delivery (the “how”). For example, the “what” can be taught as formulating a telegram (e.g., “Car won’t start. I pump accelerator. Carburetor gets flooded.”). The “how” then focuses on filling in the appropriate small words (e.g., “My car often won’t start after it sits for a few minutes. I pump the accelerator a few times before trying again. Often, the carburetor gets flooded.”)


∙ Finally practice, practice, practice. Do not let that modern-day piece of plastic dominate your life. It is far better to use the telephone and stutter than to avoid using the telephone.


As noted, many people who clutter also stutter. And often the cluttering is covered up or masked by the stuttering. In some of these individuals, the cluttering emerges as the individual gets control of the stuttering or begins to stutter less. Yet, whether or not the clutterer also stutters (or previously stuttered), any therapy techniques that focus attention on fluency targets such as easy onset of the voice, more prolonged syllables, or correct breathing can also help the person to manage many of the cluttering symptoms. The important thing is that the clutterer learn to pay attention to—or monitor—his or her speech and do anything that makes it easier to remember to do so. Some adults who clutter are better able to monitor if they listen daily to a tape with a short sample of their disorganized cluttered speech and, immediately following, a sample of their clear, monitored speech. Some clutterers even find it helpful to listen to and compare these “wrong” and “right” speech samples several times a day.


Contributions are tax-deductible and help us continue our work.


What is the likelihood that therapy will help?


It is hard to predict whether or not a clutterer will benefit from speech therapy. Most clutterers who benefit have become convinced—from friends, family, or employers, or on their own— that they do have a significant speech problem. Also, motivation is a key element; they have good reason for working hard to change, such as the likelihood of a job promotion. On the other hand, clutterers who are not sure that they have a problem or are relatively unconcerned about it tend not to improve as much from therapy.


1/19 How can I get help for cluttering? Goals for Therapy


Since cluttering is neither common nor well understood, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) may express doubt about whether or not they can effectively evaluate and treat cluttering. If so, they can be referred to a number of sources of information about the disorder. (See the references on back panel.) With such information, many of these SLPs may well be willing to provide therapy for cluttering.


1. Reducing the frequency of stuttering Using


THE TELEPHONE A Guide For People Who Stutter


Fortunately, most SLPs who are specialists in stuttering are also willing to evaluate and treat cluttering as well. The Stuttering Foundation can supply you with the names of individuals in your geographic area that are recognized as specialists in fluency disorders. Call toll-free 800-992-9392 or visit www.StutteringHelp.org.


2. Decreasing the tension and struggle of stuttering moments 3. Working to decrease word or situation avoidances


4. Using effective communication skills such as eye contact or phrasing


5. Determining whether goals relate to long-term change or to meet a specific short-term need, such as a job interview


Working together with a speech pathologist who is knowledgeable about stuttering will help you identify your personal goals.


Expectations for Success


We hear from many people who are doubtful that stuttering therapy can help them. They may believe this because they had limited success or a bad experience in therapy years ago, or because their stuttering is worse than it’s ever been. If youhave stuttered all your life, it is unlikely that the stuttering will ever go away completely. However, a speech pathologist who is knowledgeable about stuttering can almost always help adults and teens who stutter make positive changes in their communication skills.


A Nonprofit Organization Since 1947 — Helping Those Who Stutter P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749


info@StutteringHelp.org ˙ 800-992-9392 stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ info@StutteringHelp.org 800-992-9392 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


1/19


Stuttering therapy for teens and adults usually means changing long-standing speech behaviors, emotions, and attitudes about talking and communication in general. As a result, length and type of therapy can vary greatly depending on your goals. A list of sample therapy goals for teens and adults includes:


2/21/19 5:42 PM 7Tips-NEW.indd 1 #0117* MYTHS


CLUTTERING GUIDELINES


MYTH: Stuttering is linked to intelligence.


REALITY: There is no link whatsoever between stuttering and intelligence.


Written by Kenneth O. St. Louis, Ph.D., West Virginia University


MYTH: Nervousness causes stuttering. REALITY: Nervousness does not cause stuttering. Nor should we assume that people who stutter are prone to be nervous, fearful, anxious, or shy. They have the same full range of personality traits as those who do not stutter.


MYTH: Stuttering can be “caught” through imitation or by hearing another person stutter.


REALITY: You can’t “catch” stuttering. No one knows the exact causes of stuttering, but recent research indicates that family history (genetics), neuromuscular development, and the child’s environment,


including family dynamics, all play a role in the onset of stuttering.


MYTH: It helps to tell a person to “take a deep breath before talking,” or “think about what you want to say first.”


REALITY: This advice only makes a person more self-conscious, making the stuttering worse. More helpful responses include listening patiently and modeling slow and clear speech yourself.


MYTH: Stress causes stuttering.


REALITY: As mentioned above, many complex factors are involved. Stress is not the cause, but it certainly can aggravate stuttering.


ABOUT STUTTERING


One of the most frustrating aspects about stuttering is that it is a variable disorder. In other words, sometimes you may stutter quite a bit and other times you may not. Because it is so variable and complex, stuttering is often misunderstood. Here we dis- cuss and debunk some common myths about stuttering.


WHY SPEECH THERAPY? 12/4/18 2:23 PM #0111


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ info@StutteringHelp.org 800-992-9392 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


1/19 © 2019, Stuttering Foundation of America


7. Normal rules apply. Discipline the child who stutters just as you do your other children and just as you would if he didn’t stutter.


How can I get help for neurogenic stuttering? The Stuttering Foundation of America can supply you with the names of speech-language pathologists who specialize in stuttering. Call toll-free 800-992-9392 or visit www.StutteringHelp.org.


NEUROGENIC STUTTERING


12/4/18 1:29 PM


2/21/19 12:06 PM


Traducción por Marina Llobera O’Brien, patológa de lengua hablada. 1/19


This material was compiled by Luc De Nil, Ph.D., Chair of the Graduate Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, and by Paul Sandor, M.D., Director of the Tourette’s Syndrome Clinic, University Health Network.


P.O. Box 11749 ˙ Memphis, TN 38111-0749 ˙ info@StutteringHelp.org 800-992-9392 ˙ stutteringhelp.org ˙ tartamudez.org


1/19


ANISHnew.indd 1


Notes_to_teacher-SPanish-NEW.indd 1 #0110


2/7/19 10:52 AM


Spanish_tele_brochureNEW.indd 112/7/18 1:35 PM #0048


Tourettes-NEW.indd 1 #0049


12/7/18 1:34 PM #0062


1/24/19 12:48 PM #0112


A complete set of current Stuttering Foundation brochures and leafl ets, 23 in all, including three pamphlets in Spanish. *Double-sided fl yers have English on one side and Spanish on the other.


Complete Brochure Set No. 0039 $3 Set of 25 of Any Brochure $3 800-992-9392 • www.stutteringhelp.org 16


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