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Send all news and press releases to: editorial@heavyliftpfi.com


Editor - David Kershaw dk@heavyliftpfi.com News editor - Sophie Barnes sb@heavyliftpfi.com


Correspondents: Ian Cochran, Phil Hastings, Felicity Landon, Chris Lewis, Yvonne Mulder, and Megan Ramsay in the United Kingdom Joseph R Fonsecain India Nicola Capuzzo in Italy Debbie Owenin South Africa Dave/Iain MacIntyre in New Zealand Gregory DL Morris and Sarah Fowler in the USA Ian Putzger and Leo Ryanin Canada


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www.heavyliftpfi.com Tackling climate change challenges


The 2010s played host to huge structural changes in the energy industry. In that time, the heavy and lift and project logistics industry continuously adapted, tackling countless challenges resulting from changes often (but not always) beyond its control. Today, environmental concerns dominate the narrative and another step was


T


made to protect the natural world on January 1. The implementation of the IMO’s sulphur 2020 regulations mark one of the biggest challenges the international shipping industry has ever had to negotiate. The strategies adopted by carriers, and the cost implications for shippers and the logistics supply chain, are detailed throughout this issue. Still, in a wider sense, change has been slow. Demand for fossil fuels is growing and their phase-out


in the medium-term is improbable unless there is a dramatic shift in the way the world both generates and consumes its power. Oversize cargoes to support the oil and gas sector will need to be moved. However, achieving the next major milestone – 2050 greenhouse gas (GHG) emission targets – will


require global change. Several countries now aim to deliver ‘net-zero’ greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2050, broadly in line with advice from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In the next ten years, wind and solar projects will grow at a pace hitherto unseen. Capital


investments will accelerate as energy production and storage technology improves and development costs tumble. The rise of sustainable investing will spin the wheels faster still. But, as the adage goes, ‘money makes the world go round’. The sheer volume of solar and wind


energy installations needed to meet the Paris Agreement on Climate Change (limiting global temperature increase to well below 2 degrees Celsius compared with pre-industrial levels) is inconceivable without the oil industry’s capital and project management skills. The Economist reported that of the EUR80 billion (USD88.2 billion) invested by Europe’s big seven


energy firms in 2019, just 7.4 percent was allocated towards clean energy. Globally, according to banking group UBS, roughly EUR1.2 trillion (USD1.32 trillion) must be spent annually on renewables until 2050 to achieve the Paris Agreement goal. For a sense of perspective, roughly USD500 billion is spent each year on oil and gas projects. But, as national climate commitments become more stringent and governments tackle big oil, producers will see their margins shrink unless they diversify. Examples of this diversification exist: oil company Repsol said in January that it plans to reduce its


net carbon footprint to zero in the next 30 years. We have also seen Ørsted, E.On, Iberdrola and Enel, among others, recalibrate and push into green projects. In the years to come digitalisation will have a key role to play, although the extent of its application in


our sector is unknown. Project logistics continues to be, and will remain, a people business. It cannot be entirely automated and a computer cannot replicate trust between partners. On the theme of technology, Dell’s Realize Technology 2030 report (published in 2018) claimed that


85 percent of the jobs that will exist in 2030 have not yet been invented. This sounds outrageous but it certainly piqued my interest. How different can the world be in ten short years? However things develop, those active in the project logistics industry will need to adapt, yet again, to


a changing world – something that the sector’s participants have proven capable of doing, time and again. HLPFIwill be here alongside you on that journey.


David Kershaw, Editor


he turn of a new decade invariably brings about a sense of reflection, along with thoughts as to how the years ahead might pan out. Upheaval seems to summarise both times past and what lies in wait. Will the project logistics industry, and the sectors that rely on its services, be dramatically different in a decade’s time?


The 2000s were characterised by the emergence of modular construction.


The front cover for this issue illustrates the wide variety of industries that Wallenius Wilhelmsen Ocean (WW Ocean) accommodates with its modern fleet of ro-ro vessels. Roll-on roll-off (ro-ro) is the safest, fastest and most cost-efficient way to transport breakbulk cargo. As the world’s most experienced ro-ro breakbulk carrier, WW Ocean offers its customers unmatched expertise in handling high, heavy and long loads. Even the most experienced logisticians are sometimes surprised to learn that WW Ocean vessels can transport products up to 6.1 m high, 12 m wide and 400 tonnes in weight.


2020 DVV MEDIA INTERNATIONAL: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical (including photocopying), recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission from the copyright owners. Multiple copying of the contents of this publication without prior written approval is not permitted. Heavy Lift & Project Forwarding International is published bi-monthly by DVV Media International Ltd, 1st Floor Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, Great Britain. Origination and printing in Great Britain by Pensord Press Limited.


January/Feburary 2020 5


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