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INDUSTRY REVIEWONSHORE RENEWABLES


TII said it is essential that new designs augment the existing fleet of equipment, rather than replacing it. The company added that demand for its blade lifting technology (pictured) is increasing.


and only those who commit to developing will survive.” As wind turbines develop, driven by the


market to produce more megawatts for less money, the need for specialist trailer equipment becomes more relevant. “We have been buying the latest trailer equipment for over 20 years,” said Collett. “That will not change in the future, although it gives us a large headache to consider: what we do to purchase the new equipment, and what we do to dispose of the old obsolete equipment?”


Infrastructure requirements He elaborated that “as components increase in size and weight, then the infrastructure on site must also increase. However, what we are seeing more and more at the moment is actually a reduction in the site infrastructure as project budgets are squeezed. This is ultimately impacting on site safety and the accident statistics.” For this reason ESTA, the European


trade association for abnormal load transport and mobile cranes, of which David Collett is president, has been working closely with the VDMA, the German manufacturers’ trade association (of which most of the wind turbine manufacturers are a member) in order to produce best-practice guidelines for transport and lifting operations in onshore wind farm construction. This guide has


58 January/February 2020


In the long term there will be only four or five global [manufacturers]. That is partly because they require such a large budget for research and development for new designs. – David Collett, Collett & Sons


been two years in the making and is due to be finalised and released in early 2020. deugro’s Thomsen also drew attention


the importance of safety, not just on wind farm construction sites but along the related logistics supply chain too. He said that all


stakeholders involved in such projects see the avoidance of accidents as a very important pillar. Indeed: “When we design and deliver


any transport execution plan, health and safety is at the heart of everything we do, making it the critical factor to a successful, safe and timely execution of logistics within a complicated project.” deugro saw particularly strong activity in


the Scandinavian countries in 2019. One example was the delivery of 67 turbines in the north of Norway. The limited port facilities and the nature of the access roads to the site resulted in extensive design and engineering work to overcome these challenges. Thomsen noted: “On many onshore


wind energy projects there is a focus on ‘just- in-time’ deliveries, involving major heavy haulage logistics activities that need to be coordinated wi th the specialised marine vessel solution, the road movement restrictions and the site construction activities.” The project was completed as planned, before the winter, with on-site supervision ensuring the safe delivery of every component.


Rapid change Looking ahead, the onshore wind energy sector will continue to change rapidly, with developers increasing the size and power output of turbines. “This will result in higher technical complexity and more challenges for the


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