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INDUSTRY REVIEWONSHORE RENEWABLES


expected 2019 to see the fastest pace of renewable power capacity additions in four years. Global renewable power capacity is set to expand again by half, or 1,200 GW, by 2024 – equivalent to the total installed power capacity of the USA. “We were also successful in securing


shipments of high-voltage equipment in power transmission and distribution,” said Lehovd. “The market growth potential for this type of equipment is strong, driven by high demand for electricity from emerging economies such as China and India, which leads to increasing power generation and distribution. In our view, Asia-Pacific will be the fastest-growing market for high-voltage equipment. Increasing demand for switch gear and transformers is the key factor propelling growth.” Within the macroeconomic growth of


renewable energy, and cost parity in some areas, there is still the variable of government support in many regions. “Cargo flows are naturally affected by changes in government policies and the geopolitical climate in general,” confirmed Stian Omli, global head of breakbulk sales at Höegh. “What we can see is a shift in source


markets,” Omli added. “China is still the major market for parts, but other regions, such as India and Southeast Asia are also coming in now. European manufacturers are also active exporters.”


Largest pure car carriers To transport non-rolling cargoes, Höegh puts its large fleet of roll trailers to good use. “We have close to 3,500 roll trailers globally, which range from 20-80 ft (6.09-23.4 m) that can move cargo up to 160 tonnes,” said Omli. “We also have six of the largest pure car/truck vessels in the world able to carry up to 8,500 car equivalent units. The beauty of these ships is [despite the name] their capability to take non-rolling cargo up to 12m wide, 6.5 m tall and weighing up to 375 tonnes.” He added: “Fully enclosed cargo space


protects these often high-value components from external pollutants and forces of nature such as sea spray, sand and dust. All cargo movements carry risk. However, as we roll the cargo on and off our vessels, we do not have any issues with high liftings and consequently associated accidents. The cargo is lashed on to the roll trailer which requires only very low lifting of the cargo.” In terms of specialised equipment, some


countries are now looking for blade lifters, according to Lars Schødt, area sales manager and member of the wind expert team in the sales division of heavy vehicle and


56 January/February 2020


Last May, Groupe Cayon transported an 85-tonne, 6.4 m-long transformer substation in Gennevilliers, France, for EDF. The land leg of the move took three days because it had to alternate between a lowbed semi-trailer and self-propelled vehicle made by Faymonville. Group Cayon has in its fleet two 48-tonne capacity, six-axle Cometto MSPE 6/4 modules and two 48-tonne capacity, four-axle MSPE 4/2 modules.


equipment manufacturer TII Group. “We see bigger onshore wind turbines all


over,” Schødt elaborated. “And all the other parts of wind turbines are also getting bigger. Thus there is a need for equipment that can transport longer blades. That is in focus in many countries where we have never seen any big wind turbine in the past, and not only in Europe. “They have now ordered these wind


turbines, such as the Vestas V150. Our new rotor blade transport system (RBTS) does not have any length limitation. [That is in addition to] proven equipment for the other components of wind energy.”


Customers demand more and more modular trailers with pendulum axles, because they provide more stability and safety.


– Lars Schødt, TII Group


It is essential that new designs augment


the existing fleet of equipment, rather than replacing it, because in many regions renewable energy projects are still subject to the vagaries of government subsidies. “We experience the result of such changes right away,” said Schødt “because nobody needs new equipment and special support in countries affected by changes and retracted subsidiaries. As a result, we must focus on other countries and markets.”


Equipment choices For many oversize loads, standard equipment can be used, Schødt noted, especially the modular trailer system. “For example, transport companies can add more axle lines in response to different road [conditions and] regulations. That can include applying a special dolly. Where we have experienced a change is for the transport of tower sections, which require bigger adapters because of the increased weight and diameter.” He added: “Customers demand more and


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