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COUNTRY REPORTTURKEY


Bati copes with extreme conditions


Bati shipped over 50 transformers in 2019, as well as several yachts. The highlight of the year was the launch of a super


yacht in southern Turkey, said Kaan Aydin, business development manager at Bati Innovative Logistics. The roll-on and float-out operation took place in challenging weather, which led to a four-day postponement. “The launch had to stop several times because of


the extreme conditions, while the wind speed reached 150 km/h during the night,” he explained. The 63 m-long, 900-tonne yacht was rolled onto


the multipurpose vessel RollDock Storm – an appropriate name in the circumstances. Bati is the commercial agent in Turkey for RollDock, a division of heavy transport specialist Roll Group.


The devaluation of Turkey’s currency has


its advantages, too: it has led to an increase in outbound project cargo. Eldener pointed out: “We have several major transformer manufacturers in Turkey and they have been exporting more in 2019. These are pieces that weigh more than 150 tonnes.” The Middle East is a huge market for


transformers and, according to Aydin, Turkey is one of the biggest exporters of these items to Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and other countries in the region.


Manufacturing Turkey is also home to several boiler and tank manufacturers, and its shipyards are in production and working well, Eldener said. Erdil added: “All the transformer, wind


blade and tower, and steel structure factories are fully booked for the first two quarters of 2020. I am not expecting any decline in investments and projects because all project logistics players in the market have been making hundreds of budgetary quotes for this year.” Plus, every year the number of Turkish


contractors in the ENR ‘Top 250 International Contractors’ is increasing (in 2019 there were 44) and Turkey remains the world’s second- biggest contractor after China. “Turkish forwarders not only manage


cargoes to, from and through Turkey, but also the cross-trades that are controlled by Turkish contractors. Those contractors control hundreds of million dollars’ worth of freight in a year,” Erdil said. All in all, his view is that Turkey’s


www.heavyliftpfi.com


investments, development and growth “will not be slowed down under any circumstances”. Indeed, Aydin said the country’s yacht,


transformer, power plant and wind blade projects are getting “better and bigger every day”, with activity including offshore wind farms and super yachts weighing in excess of 1,000 tonnes. “I strongly believe the biggest market in


2020 will be the energy sector and the nuclear power plant will play the lead role in Turkey this year,” he affirmed. Construction of the Akkuyu plant began


in April 2018 and the first reactor is set to be completed in 2023. In September 2019, Rosatom won a licence to build the second of four planned reactors at the site. Although some projects in the CIS have


been awarded to European companies, as noted above, there are still large volumes of transhipment cargo that move through Turkey bound for CIS destinations. “During the non-winter [navigation]


period we reach the Caspian Sea from Turkey, Bulgaria and Romania via the Volga and Don rivers with Russian-flagged


The country’s yacht, transformer, power plant and wind blade projects are getting “better and bigger every day”. – Kaan Aydin, Bati Innovative Logistics


Omskiy-type vessels,” Aydin explained. “The second and more common option


is road freight from Turkey to the Caspian region; the preferred ports of Turkey for transhipment are Derince and Mersin.” A potential new area for Turkish project


logisticians is oil exploration in the Eastern Mediterranean, around Cyprus. “This may cause some issues because you have Turks, Greek Cypriots, Israelis, Americans and other multinationals all looking for oil there, and that needs to be coordinated to minimise friction,” Eldener said. Right now, there is not much activity


between Turkey and Iraq in terms of project cargo. The ongoing civil war in neighbouring Syria, as well as the conflict between Turkey and Kurds there, is a complicating factor. But Eldener is hopeful that this latter issue will be resolved soon and the border re-opened.


Rebuilding Syria Once that happens, “there is a lot to do in Syria, and geographically speaking, Turkish contractors are the first contact for rebuilding. So we are looking forward to a permanent peace agreement,” he said. Aydin agreed and he sees huge potential


for development there: “Even though there are a lot of projects waiting in the pipeline, none of the big players have popped the big balloon of Syria yet. But I think that 2020 will be a big opportunity for the project market to dominate and focus on Syria, and Turkey will be the best option to reach Syria, with the best ports and roads.” HLPFI


January/February 2020 49


The Middle East is an important market for Turkey’s transformer manufacturers.


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