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SUPPLEMENTREVIEW & OUTLOOK


Blue Water Shipping signed a deal with Siemens Gamesa in May 2019 for the transport and handling of wind turbine components for four offshore wind farms.


In the offshore wind arena, Blue Water


Shipping signed a deal with Siemens Gamesa for the transport and handling of wind turbine components for four offshore wind farms – three in the North Sea and one off the east coast of the USA. Taiwan also continued to excite, with Heerema Marine Contractors awarded the transport and installation contract for the 900 MW Greater Changhua 1 and 2a offshore wind farms. Cargo was also moving for the Formosa 1 Phase 2 offshore wind project throughout the year, courtesy of United Wind Logistics (see pages 104-105), United Engineering Solutions, Jumbo and ALE.


Consolidation Last year kicked off with Denmark’s DSV making an offer to acquire Swiss rival Panalpina. While the first offer was rejected, the merger ultimately took place, with the two companies reaching an agreement in April to join forces in a deal worth roughly CHF4.6 billion (USD4.6 billion). During the discussions, Kuwait-headquartered logistics services provider Agility also engaged in talks about “potential strategic opportunities” but lost out to DSV’s offer. The year was not without its fair share of


other tie-ups, with Hamburg-headquartered United Heavy Lift (UHL) and Denmark’s Ocean7 Projects opening joint offices in Norway and Malaysia. Also strengthening their relationship


were Dongbang Transport Logistics and COSCO Shipping Specialized Carriers. The companies signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) in October that will see them jointly bid on large-scale projects. Elsewhere, BigLift Shipping agreed to


cooperate with South Korea’s Chung Yang Shipping (CY) in the heavy transport sector. In November, Hamburg-headquartered


40 January/February 2020


Global Renewables Shipbrokers (GRS) established a strategic partnership with COLI Schiffahrt & Transport in order to service Japan’s rapidly emerging offshore renewable energy market. Anticipating significant growth in the


Balkan markets, EMS-Fehn-Group and Prangl will also strengthen their cooperation and team up on selected projects. This year began with a large-scale merger


in the engineered transport and heavy lifting market segment, with Mammoet completing the acquisition of competitor ALE. Combined, the two companies have a network that spans 140 offices and branches worldwide, making the joint entity a formidable player in the heavy logistics segment and one that will surely shake up the sector. For an overview of the merged entity's combined crane fleet, you can turn to pages 130-136. Consolidation has been a common


feature on the shipper side of the equation too, especially among wind turbine OEMs. 2015-2016 was perhaps the most pivotal period for merger and acquisition (M&A) activity in this sector – with Siemens acquiring Gamesa; GE’s renewable and wind division’s acquisition of Alstom’s assets; and the Nordex and Acciona deal. The latest agreement has seen the now merged entity Siemens Gamesa Renewable


This year began with a large-scale merger in the engineered transport and heavy lifting market segment, with Mammoet completing the acquisition of competitor ALE.


Energy (SGRE) complete the acquisition of Senvion’s European service assets and intellectual property. The project logistics sector is starting to


feel the fallout, with fewer manufacturers on the scene. In the long term, it is expected that the top five leading wind turbine OEMs will consolidate their positions even further and control three-quarters of the sector by 2028. Uncertainty has been the order of the day for a long time now, but there is also much to be proud of. In October 2019, HLPFI held the


inaugural Heavy Lift Awards, which were designed to celebrate and reward the achievements of the heavy lift, specialised transport and project logistics sector in the face of such adversity. The quality of the shortlisted and


winning entries demonstrated the magnitude of these accomplishments and HLPFI looks forward to showcasing the successes of this dynamic sector once again on October 21, 2020 in London, UK.


Outlook Although the challenges of the past decade will continue, opportunities are sure to arise during 2020. A change in the fortunes of the sector, however, is reliant on a more stable geopolitical environment. The sector will be sure to keep a keen eye on the escalating conflict between the USA and Iran, and a host of presidential and parliamentary elections scheduled this year. Further easing of longstanding trade tensions between the USA and China would be welcomed too. HLPFI is committed to embarking on


this rollercoaster journey with you and would like to thank you – our readers, advertisers and sponsors – for your continued support in these turbulent times. HLPFI


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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