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more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


NEWS ROUND-UPCARGO SHIPMENTS NEWS in BRIEF


AAL ships pleasure craft AAL’s S-class ship Bangkok has transported 12 vessels from Genoa, Italy, to the US Virgin Islands and Port Everglades, Florida. A total 3,500 sq m of cargo was loaded on the ship, including a 51 m-long superyacht weighing 400 tonnes – well within the 700-tonne lifting capacity of Bangkok’s cranes.


Reactors head to Riyadh Four hydrocracker reactors from Walter Tosto have departed the port of Ortona, Italy, onboard a Jumbo heavy lift vessel. Measuring 21 m in length and with a diameter of more than 5 m, the components are the last four units to be shipped to Riyadh for a refinery project in Saudi Arabia. In total, Walter Tosto has supplied eight reactors of the same type for the project.


Fracht in TBM relocation Fracht has redelivered a 515-tonne tunnel boring machine (TBM) from the UK to Germany. Prior to transport, the TBM – named Mary – was disassembled into 21 pieces for decontamination, with particular attention paid to the 30-tonne cutter head, 70-tonne shield, 95-tonne machine can and 20-tonne tail shield.


Windpark turbines move Van der Vlist has transported wind turbines for Windpark Deil in the Netherlands, on behalf of Vestas. Each wind turbine consisted of 12 components. The nacelles, drivetrains and hubs were transported from Denmark to the project site by road. Due to the length of the blades (67 m each) and the diameter of the tower sections (4.5 m), these components were shipped from Denmark to a local port before being transported by road to the project site.


Collett delivers girders Collett & Sons has delivered the first three 44 m-long paired girders for the Newhaven port access road project in the UK. Utilising its fleet of ballasted heavy tractors and modular trailers configured as double bogies, the three loads were moved 323 miles (519.8 km) from the Cleveland Bridge UK facility in Darlington to the BAM Nuttall site in Newhaven.


20 January/February 2020


Mammoet completes Ain Dubai project role M


ammoet has completed its role in the construction of Ain


Dubai – the world’s tallest observation wheel. During 2016, the largest


elements – the legs and spindle – were installed directly from a barge using Mammoet’s PTC 200-DS ring crane and a 3,000-ton (2,721.6-tonne) capacity crawler crane. Each 890-ton (807.4-tonne)


leg, which measured 126m long, was rolled onto Mammoet’s barge in Abu Dhabi using 40 axle lines of SPMTs before transportation to the installation site. Subsequently, Mammoet


said that it set a world record by lifting the 1,900-ton (1,723.7- tonne) spindle to sit on top of the four legs; it claimed it was the heaviest and highest tandem lift ever undertaken. Following the positioning of


the legs and the spindle, Mammoet lifted eight rim pieces


and temporary spokes. Over a period of more than three months, Mammoet


supported the removal of the temporary spokes until all eight were disconnected from the


wheel. Each 112 m-long spoke, weighing 470 tons (426.4 tonnes), was lifted off the structure in tandem by 600-ton (544-tonne) and 400-ton (362.9-tonne) capacity crawler cranes.


BigLift delivers mine modules to Baffinland


Baffinland Iron Mines in Canada wanted to increase the capacity at its mine but the extremely remote location, with a very short ice-free period, made cargo deliveries extremely challenging. The equipment required for expansion had to be pre-fabricated and delivered within just two ice-free months. BigLift Shipping was awarded


three shipments for this project. Due to the very short weather window for heavy lift shipping, all three allocated vessels were required to discharge their cargoes in direct succession. BigLift Barentsz was first to


arrive and discharge. It departed Bremerhaven, Germany with four major cargoes on deck. The


screening building measured 30 m x 33 m x 34 m and weighed 1,757 tonnes, while the crusher building tipped the scales at 1,403 tonnes. Also included aboard the ship was the car dumper building and


the positioner hall, plus a quantity of auxiliary pieces. The modules were discharged using


SPMTs that had been brought along from Bremerhaven. Shortly afterwards, Happy


Diamond arrived from Haiphong in Vietnam with part of the conveyor belt system. Molengracht followed with more conveyor belt parts, which had been loaded in Haiphong and Ho Chi Minh City.


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