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EQUIPMENTCRANES more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


Liebherr is experiencing increasing demand for its strongest and biggest mobile harbour crane, the LHM 800, seen here at Esbjerg in Denmark.


and automatically stops operation before the operator unintentionally enters an unsafe zone. It assists the operator in leaving the danger zone without having to activate the safety bypass switch. Both the measured wind speed and the actual crane configuration (boom length, boom angle) are taken into consideration when calculating the current hazardous situation for the crane. “When the conditions


become too dangerous, the system gives a warning. The actual status is visible for the operator in the cabin at all times. At wind speeds of 10-16 m per second, the operator can adjust the maximum lifting capacity through a simple selection on the control panel.”


Increasing demand With regard to the company’s range of mobile harbour cranes, Liebherr’s Philipp Helberg, marketing manager, maritime cranes, is equally positive. “We feel an increasing demand in the market, especially for our strongest and biggest mobile harbour crane, the LHM 800. Besides other sales, we sold two units to Danish customers last year. Both of them will use the crane for the increasing demand to lift parts for the wind energy industry, like wind turbines and rotor blades. “Tomorrow’s wind turbines


will be bigger and heavier and our customers are already preparing for this now to provide their customers with the best possible service. Especially in combination with a second LHM, rotor blades can be lifted very well in a tandem lift.”


HLPFI XCMG crawler crane makes international debut


Xuzhou Construction Machinery Group’s (XCMG) 4,000- ton (3,628.7-tonne) capacity crawler crane has lifted a wash tower weighing 1,926 tons (1,747 tonnes) at a site in Jubail Industrial Zone in Dammam, Saudi Arabia. Since its launch in 2013, the huge Chinese-built crane has travelled over 30,000 km and participated in


136 January/February 2020


11 major projects in eight provinces across China. The lift in Dammam was its first-ever overseas


operation. The wash tower was 101.1 m high and 8.6 m in diameter. XCMG’s XGC88000 was used as the main crane, with a 1,250-ton (1,134-tonne) capacity crane for tail lifting. The operation took


more than five hours to complete. XCMG said that the XGC88000 will go on to lift two


1,312-ton (1,190.2-tonne) reactors for the same project before participating in related projects on behalf of Saudi National Natural Gas Company and an oil refinery project in Oman.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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