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EQUIPMENTCRANES more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


bauma 2019 saw the launch of the all-terrain ATF-100-4.1 crane from Tadano.


60 m-long main boom and “are an answer to increasingly strict axle load regulations”, said Tadano. The five-axle ATF-120- 5.1, for example, can travel on public roads with an axle load below 10 tonnes, or 48 tonnes total weight. Looking ahead, Tadano


added that it is working on developments to the AC range of all-terrain cranes from Demag. While it is too early to talk about specifics, the manufacturer was confident that it will be able to release further information about new products in the near future – perhaps at this year’s ConExpo exhibition, which takes place from March 10-14 in Las Vegas. It has also been an eventful


year for Liebherr, which, in August, inaugurated its rail- mounted heavy lift crane – the TCC 78000 – in Rostock, Germany. Boasting a maximum l ifting capacity of 1,600 tonnes, and with a total height of 164 m, the crane will be used for handling heavy cargoes from the offshore, shipbuilding, industrial plant construction and logistics sectors, as well as for Liebherr’s


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in-house logistics processes such as the production, assembly and dispatch of maritime cranes. In addition, the TCC 78000 also offers other companies the possibility of handling heavy 1,600-tonne loads at the port of Rostock.


First major operation One of the first major operations of the TCC 78000 is the installation of the HLC 295000 heavy lift crane onto DEME’s wind farm installation and platform decommissioning vessel Orion. The HLC 295000 is the largest offshore crane Liebherr has ever constructed. It has a lifting capacity of 5,000 tonnes at an outreach of 30 m. The HLC’s boom measures 160 m long, while the whole crane has a height of 90 m. For the company’s division


that manufacturers crawler cranes with a lifting capacity larger than 300 tonnes – Liebherr-Werk Ehingen – Wolfgang Beringer said the market is developing positively, albeit from a low level. He explained that “the reason for the lower sales numbers in the past was mainly the downturn in the wind energy industry”. In mid-2018, Liebherr-Werk


Ehingen expanded its range of crawler cranes in the class below 1,000 tonnes with the launch of the 800-tonne capacity LR 1800- 1.0. Designed for industrial work such as power plant construction and jobs in the petrochemicals industry, the unit was put to the test in January 2019 when its 84 m long main boom, equipped with a derrick system, completed a 560-tonne lift at a 12 m radius. In


With regard to crawler cranes, we have invested a lot into innovative assistance systems, which both increase operational safety as well as simplify handling. –Wolfgang Pfister, Liebherr-Werk Nenzing


the meantime, serial production has started and the first units of the LR 1800-1.0 have been delivered.


Crawler cranes At Liebherr-Werk Nenzing, the manufacturer produces crawler cranes with a lifting capacity up to 300 tonnes. According to Wolfgang Pfister, here, worldwide demand is up in terms of unit sales. “However, this trend is mainly driven by China as well as Southeast Asian countries. In addition, the increase in unit sales was very much driven by the very small size machinery (below 100 tonnes capacity). The mid- size or large size machinery developed below the market average,” added Pfister. He continued: “With regard to


crawler cranes, we have invested a lot into innovative assistance systems, which both increase operational safety as well as simplify handling. One example is the assistance system: Boom Up-and-Down Aid. “The system indicates the


approach to the tipping border January/February 2020


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